Can we calculate the rolling resistance coefficient theoretically?

In summary, the conversation revolves around the concept of rolling resistance and whether there is an existing formula to calculate its coefficient based on physical and material properties of a body without any experimentation. The individual is looking for clarification on the terminology and if rolling resistance can be calculated solely based on compression or deformation of the surface.
  • #1
Souhardya Nandi
17
3
I was wondering that if rolling resistance is basically caused by slight deformation of a body, we must have formulas in place to relate it to the physical and material properties of a body. But when I went ravaging for it in library or internet, everything was experimental. I wished to know from all fellow PFians if you have knowledge of any formula which can calculate the rolling resistance coefficient of a body from elasticity,radius,density, etc. without any experimentation whatsoever ?
 
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  • #2
What's rolling friction? There is static friction (not slipping), dynamic friction (slipping), and rolling resistance (deformation of the rolling body as it moves)...
 
  • #3
berkeman said:
What's rolling friction? There is static friction (not slipping), dynamic friction (slipping), and rolling resistance (deformation of the rolling body as it moves)...
You misunderstood my question, sir. I am not asking what rolling friction is. I am asking if there is an existing formula to find the rolling friction coefficient of a body from its material properties without any form of experimentation. Do reply if you can.
 
  • #4
Souhardya Nandi said:
You misunderstood my question, sir. I am not asking what rolling friction is. I am asking if there is an existing formula to find the rolling friction coefficient of a body from its material properties without any form of experimentation. Do reply if you can.
I understood the question, but your terminology may have a problem. There is no such thing as rolling friction (except for bearing friction maybe). Do you mean that you want to understand if Rolling Resistance can be calculated?

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  • #5

Related to Can we calculate the rolling resistance coefficient theoretically?

1. What is the rolling resistance coefficient?

The rolling resistance coefficient is a measure of the resistance that a wheel or tire experiences when rolling over a surface. It is a dimensionless value that represents the force required to keep the wheel in motion divided by the weight of the wheel.

2. How is the rolling resistance coefficient calculated?

The rolling resistance coefficient can be calculated by dividing the rolling resistance force by the weight of the object being rolled. This can be determined experimentally by measuring the force required to keep the wheel in motion at a constant speed and then dividing by the weight of the wheel.

3. Can the rolling resistance coefficient be calculated theoretically?

Yes, the rolling resistance coefficient can be calculated theoretically by using equations that take into account factors such as the tire pressure, tire material, and surface characteristics. However, these calculations may not be as accurate as experimental measurements.

4. What factors affect the rolling resistance coefficient?

The rolling resistance coefficient can be affected by various factors such as tire pressure, tire size, tire material, surface roughness, and speed of the wheel. These factors can either increase or decrease the rolling resistance coefficient.

5. Why is the rolling resistance coefficient important?

The rolling resistance coefficient is important because it affects the energy efficiency of moving objects. A higher rolling resistance coefficient means more energy is required to keep the object in motion, which can result in increased fuel consumption and decreased performance. Reducing the rolling resistance coefficient can lead to improved energy efficiency and cost savings.

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