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Can we find EM radiation in charged particle's decays?

  1. Nov 6, 2014 #1

    ORF

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    Hello.

    I was taught that a charge which changes its velocity must radiate (at least, in classical electrodynamics).

    Let's consider a charged particle which decays into another charged particle (and, maybe, others neutral particles; but not photons). In this case, can we find electromagnetic radiation?

    I found a particular example*,
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bremsstrahlung#Beta_decay
    but I wonder if this a general feature of charged particle's decays.

    If this question is already answered in this forum, just tell me, and I will delete this thread.

    Thank you for your time :)

    Greetings
    *"The "inner" bremsstrahlung arises from the creation of the electron [...]"
    PS: My mother language is not English, so I'll be glad if you correct any mistake.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 6, 2014 #2

    mfb

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    Staff: Mentor

    In classical physics, indeed.
    If you explicitely rule out photons as decay product, then we cannot find photons.

    Bremsstrahlung is not a particle decay.
     
  4. Nov 6, 2014 #3

    ORF

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    Hello.

    Wikipedia's article says that exist "radiation from the creation of a charged particle". Maybe the first question I should have made is: can we find bremsstrahlung in charged particle's creations/annihilations?

    I put the idea into the wrong words. Let's take one example: the beta-decay itself doesn't involve photons, but they appear as Bremsstrahlung.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bremsstrahlung#Beta_decay

    My (reformulated) doubt is: every charged-to-charged particle's decay involve Bremsstrahlung?

    Thank you for your patience and time :)

    Greetings.
     
  5. Nov 6, 2014 #4

    mfb

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    That can be called Bremsstrahlung as well, right. I thought of the process of electrons in matter in post 2.

    At least not always in a way particle detectors could see it. Very low-energetic photons... could be.
     
  6. Nov 7, 2014 #5

    ORF

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    Hello.

    Ok, that was what I thought. Is there any book/link which explains this issue? I would like further information :)

    Thank you for your time :)

    Greetings.
     
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