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Can you relate sound frequency's to light frequency's?

  1. Sep 7, 2009 #1
    I heard that the color red has a frequency of 43 trillion hz, and if you divide that by 2 over and over until you get a hz range that's audible to the human ear you could find the equivalent Octave of the musical note to hear what that color sounds like. I also heard that light is vibrating photons and sound is vibrating air molecules so you can compare them... If you had a ear that could hear ultra high frequency's could you hear the photons vibrating and would they intern vibrate the air molecules next to them on the same frequency? I see lots of charts on the web comparing color to sound as if they are the same thing, is there a practical way to look at this? I hear lasers can generate underwater sound dose this relate? And is the frequincy of a sound underwater the same as it would be if the sound was in air?
     
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  3. Sep 7, 2009 #2

    Integral

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    Your broad statment does not lend itself to a answer. Could you narrow it down a bit.
     
  4. Sep 7, 2009 #3
    Sorry... Did not want to post all 4 questions separtely sence they are all related, here they are in less of a mess, thanks.



    1.If you had a ear that could hear ultra high frequency's could you hear the photons vibrating and would they intern vibrate the air molecules next to them on the same frequency?

    2.I see lots of charts on the web comparing color to sound as if they are the same thing, is there a scientific way to do this?

    3.I hear lasers can generate underwater sound dose this prove true the statment that " Light is vibrating photons and sound is vibrating air molecules so you can compare them " ?

    4.And is the frequincy of a sound underwater the same as it would be if the sound was in air?
     
  5. Sep 7, 2009 #4

    Vanadium 50

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    1. No, sound is not light.

    2. No, sound is not light.

    3. Whoever told you lasers generate underwater sound is mistaken. (Well, I suppose you could make underwater sound by banging two laser pointers together, but that doesn't really count)

    4. The frequency of a sound underwater is the same as in air, but the wavelength is not.
     
  6. Sep 7, 2009 #5
    http://www.physorg.com/news171284762.html says lasers generate underwater sound, are they twisting the words around and thats not what is really going on? I dont know if you see the same ad at the top of this page under my first post but it has the http://www.physorg.com/news171284762.html website telling all about how the military is making sound underwater with lasers... Is that not really exactly what is going on and they are just twisting words around or somthing?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 24, 2017
  7. Sep 7, 2009 #6

    ZapperZ

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    You should read the article very carefully and not just stop at the title. In particular, pay attention to this passage:

    Zz.
     
  8. Sep 8, 2009 #7

    Andy Resnick

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    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 24, 2017
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