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Central and South American Volcanos

  1. Jun 28, 2016 #1

    Astronuc

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    have been active.

    Some really spectacular images (the first image is of Fuego in Guatemala)

    http://www.wired.com/2016/06/central-american-volcanoes-let-spectacular-eruptions/

    In addition to Fuego, volcano Turrialba in Costa Rica has been erupting. A strong explosive eruption occurred June 24 and 11 eruptions have occurred over the following weekend.

    Fuego, Guatemala
    http://volcano.si.edu/volcano.cfm?vn=342090

    Turrialba, Costa Rica
    http://volcano.si.edu/volcano.cfm?vn=345070
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 30, 2016 #2

    jedishrfu

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    Is there any trend developing where we can anticipate some dormant volcanoes to come alive?
     
  4. Jun 30, 2016 #3

    Astronuc

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    I don't know the answer, but there are several volcanos from Mexico down through Central America to Ecuador

    In Mexico, Popocatepetl has been erupting since March 2016
    http://earthsky.org/earth/popocatepetl-volcano-mexico-eruption-april-2016
    https://www.volcanodiscovery.com/popocatepetl/news.html
    http://volcano.si.edu/volcano.cfm?vn=341090

    Mt Tungurahua in Ecuador had a spectacular eruption in March 2016
    http://phys.org/news/2016-03-ecuador-volcano-towering-cloud-ash.html
     
  5. Jul 2, 2016 #4
    The Yellowstone caldera is over due for a massive eruption. It is a super volcano that will wreak havoc on the NA continent when it erupts.
     
  6. Jul 2, 2016 #5

    jedishrfu

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    I was thinking more of a domino effect which I guess would follow a fault line as it slips.

    Yeah, I think we're in the outer edge of its range of destruction and could get an inch or so of ash.
     
  7. Jul 5, 2016 #6
    Do you have any estimates about these events have on the weather? Do you have any data on how many similar events occur on the seabed (which as you know is twice the area of the the land mass and one half the thickness)? It seems logical there must be a lot of undersea activity.
     
  8. Jul 5, 2016 #7

    davenn

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    Hi Jim
    I assume there was supposed to be a ... the effects .... in there :wink:

    there has been text written about both the Philippines, Mt Pinatubo eruption effects and well as the NW USA, Mt St Helens eruption

    A bit of googling on those would most likely yield a few papers on the subject :smile:


    Dave
     
  9. Jul 5, 2016 #8
    Yea, I know my writing needs editing. What I am after is data indicating forces from the mantle of our lovely planet do indeed effect the weather.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 7, 2016
  10. Jul 5, 2016 #9

    davenn

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    yes, I understand that and hence why I suggested you google those 2 volcanic events
    Pinatubo had a well established effect
     
  11. Jul 11, 2016 #10

    Baluncore

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    Land and ocean areas have very different geology so they have very different volcanic activity.

    The Western American mountain ranges have volcanoes well inland that produce a thick acidic lava which forms steep cones, generates a lot of ash and generally behaves unpredictably, for example Mt. St. Helens. Those volcanoes form on continental crust, usually over what is called a subduction zone.

    Oceanic volcanoes tend to be basaltic and produce a very fluid lava with little ash that makes shallow cones such as the Hawaiian chain. Underwater they produce pillow lavas at the oceanic spreading centre, the mid-oceanic ridge.

    The major influence of the Earth's crust on the (atmosphere / weather / climate) is through high altitude fine ash clouds produced by continental volcanoes.
     
  12. Jul 12, 2016 #11
    It seems to me a lot of detail is missing about how the mantle effects the surface of our lovely planet. These flows of magma consist of more than mass in the form of rock, liquids and gas. There is a lot of energy never considered that is flowing out of the mantle mostly into the ocean because 2/3s of the Earth's surface is ocean and the ocean crust is only 1/3 as thick as the continental crust. This an important detail to everything we know and love about the surface of the planet which is our only home in the universe.
     
  13. Jul 12, 2016 #12
    Hey Astronuc... I've always wondered why, besides Mt. St. Helen's, why our volcanoes in the NW seem to take an activity break between California and northern British Columbia compared to Central and South America and even the rest of the 'Ring of Fire'. Is the Pacific Plate not as active as it is elsewhere? Or is the NA plate thicker? Or...??? Thanks.
     
  14. Jul 12, 2016 #13
    I heard the plate that has caused the Rockies to rise from the sea is used up now and changes that occurred in the past have stopped. There are a lot of "dead" volcanoes in California as a result.
     
  15. Jul 12, 2016 #14

    Baluncore

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    This is a science based forum. Hypothesising that there is some unidentified energy flow between the "lovely" Earth's mantle and atmosphere does not make it so.

    You need to list the hypothetical energy flows that you believe are operating, and identify the observations that support your hypothesis. Without that supporting list of evidence your suggestion will look like a magical new age belief system, not a science.
     
  16. Jul 12, 2016 #15

    davenn

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    This is not entirely correct

    The Juan de Fuca Plate is still alive and active. hence the volcanic activity in the NW USA, eg Mt St Helens and the 1000's of earthquakes a year as it subducts under North America

    Juan_de_fuca_plate.png

    What needs to be understood is that the Juan De Fuca Plate, is the remaining part of a much larger oceanic plate called the Farallon Plate. The Farallon Plate used to exist from Vancouver Is region, BC and right down to offshore Mexico and Central America and included what is now known the Cocos Plate off the central American west coast. Over the last 10 - 15 million years, the central part of the old Farallon plate as subducted beneath North America. This central section was subducted beneath California leaving the San Andreas fault system behind as the contact between the North America and Pacific plates

    It's probably this central section that you are referring to in your comments that was responsible for the volcanics in the southern and central California regions.

    cheers
    Dave
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2016
  17. Jul 12, 2016 #16
    But all those volcanoes aren't extinct are they? (We should be using correct terms, eh? Like extinct, dormant and active when describing volcano activity levels.) And there are quite a few NW volcanoes. Even in BC where I live there are a slew of volcanoes. I understood that many of them are dormant having erupted several thousand years ago, perhaps during the last interglacial. Just wondering why, if our local plate is as active as it is, we don't get more volcanic activity. (Although I have heard that Mt. Baker in N. Washington, which I can see in all its splendour from my window, puffs a little steam now and again.)
    There must still be a lot of unknowns regarding plate tectonics and volcanism, I guess.
     
  18. Jul 12, 2016 #17

    davenn

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    which ones ?

    Any of those in central and southern California pretty much are extinct as the subduction to fuel them is no longer occurring
    Those to the north ... nthrn California, Oregon, and Washington states are still being fuelled by the Juan de Fuca subduction
    and range between dormant to active ... Mt's Shasta, Hood, Ranier etc


    Dave
     
  19. Jul 12, 2016 #18

    Baluncore

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  20. Jul 13, 2016 #19

    davenn

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    yup, one of many in Mexico and Central America that regularly burst into life

    430px-Map_mexico_volcanoes.gif


    camvolc.gif



    Dave

    see my post .... #15
     
  21. Jul 13, 2016 #20
    The data for listing energy flows from the mantle has not been measured so all that exists is an understanding that is implied in plate tectonic modeling and studies of the mid ocean rift where sea floor spreading begins and what little data exists about black smokers. The fact that only 5% of the ocean is considered explored is a big problem.
     
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