1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Centripetal motion, how to find radius?

  1. Oct 18, 2009 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    Hi guys, i need some help solving the following question.

    An Airplane is flying in a Horizontal circle at speed of 620km/h. If the wings of the plane are tilted 35 degrees to the horizontal, what is the radius of the circle in which the plane is flying? Assume that the required force is provided entirely by an aerodynamic lift that is perpendicular to the wing surface.



    2. Relevant equations




    3. The attempt at a solution


    I know that if i had time i could find the radius by using R = vT/2pi But i dont have that so how would i go about solving this Problem? Also what can i do with that angle?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 18, 2009 #2

    cepheid

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    A certain amount of centripetal acceleration is required in order to keep the plane in a circle going at that speed at a certain radius. In fact, you should know how the centripetal acceleration is related to the speed and radius of the circle.

    As for the angle, the lift force is what is providing the centripetal force. However, because the wing is tilted at a certain angle, and the lift force is perpendicular to it, only a certain component of the lift force will be pointing in the "centripetal" direction. You can calculate what that component is.
     
  4. Oct 18, 2009 #3
    Ok thank you, so i came up with the following, is this correct?
    I got the equation m(v2/R) = mgtan[tex]\theta[/tex]
    then i changed that to this as both masses cancel out.

    r = V2/gtan35

    and my answer was

    4750.8m.

    Is this correct?
     
  5. Oct 18, 2009 #4

    cepheid

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I agree with your formula. My answer is less than yours by 432.8 m.
     
  6. Oct 18, 2009 #5
    Oops i think i used 650km instead of 620km/h. I got this

    4321.29m

    Correct?
     
  7. Oct 18, 2009 #6

    cepheid

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Seems closer. Like I said in my previous post, I got ~ 4318 m
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook