Chicken nuggets anyone?

  • #1
jim mcnamara
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Main Question or Discussion Point

I do not know where to post this one. It is kind of "science-lite" IMO.

"The autopsy of chicken nuggets reads 'Chicken Little'"
Richard D. deShazo, MD, Steven Bigler, MD, Leigh Baldwin Skipworth, BA
http://www.amjmed.com/article/S0002-9343(13)00396-3/abstract

Two chicken nuggets from different sources were sectioned and analyzed microscopically.
One was 40% meat, the majority of the nugget was fat. A small portion was cartilage and bone.

Nugget #2 was 50% striated muscle - what we think of as meat. The rest was skin, epithelial tissues (gut lining), nerve tissue.

Ignoring the sample size issue, this is interesting - another aspect of the 'pink slime' syndrome in "Food Science". At the worst, though, I think it is going to undermine chicken nugget sales. It is fair to put whatever you want (FDA approved) into food, as long as consumers know. My wife gets frozen nuggets sometimes, the label just says 'chicken'. Which is correct. Just like 'pink slime' is a meat product. Misleading but correct. Here we go with more fun and games.
 

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  • #2
phinds
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Golly, I'm shocked. Shocked I say.
 
  • #3
SteamKing
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You snooze, you lose. Always get chicken tenders or breast fillets and skip anything that says nuggets. Now popcorn chicken ...
 
  • #4
256bits
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Yes shocked. That means the chicken beaks and toes are going someplace else into another product......
 
  • #5
Evo
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Not as bad as ground beef.

In a study in the USA in 2008, eight different brands of fast food hamburgers were evaluated for water content by weight and recognizable tissue types using morphological techniques that are commonly used in the evaluation of tissue's histological condition. The study found that the content of the hamburgers included:
Water content 37.7% to 62.4% (mean, 49%)
Meat content 2.1% to 14.8% (median, 12.1%)
Skeletal tissue
Connective tissue
Blood vessels
Peripheral nerve tissue
Plant material
Adipose tissue
Bone and Cartilage ("Bone and cartilage, observed in some brands, were not expected; their presence may be related to the use of mechanical separation in the processing of the meat from the animal. Small amounts of bone and cartilage may have been detached during the separation process")[5]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ground_beef

Not to mention allowable amounts of feces, insects, etc...

The Food Defect Action Levels: Levels of natural or unavoidable defects in foods that present no health hazards for humans is a publication of the United States Food and Drug Administration's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition[1] detailing acceptable levels of food contamination from sources such as maggots, thrips, insect fragments, "foreign matter", mold, rodent hairs, and insect and mammalian feces.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Food_Defect_Action_Levels
 
  • #6
jim mcnamara
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I worked for the USDA a long time ago (1967) - wheat flour had defined limits for insect frass, and exoskeleton fragments as well. These are all artifacts of grain storage.

As I said earlier this is interesting, not necessarily personally revolting. Processed foods produced in industrial environments are gonna have contaminants. Period. Seven sigma it ain't.
 
  • #7
Evo
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Well, it is personally revolting, but unavoidable if you eat commercial products. I don't know how much cleaner Kosher meat is.
 
  • #8
FlexGunship
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I feel like I've become immune to some of these reports. The concept of "eating the entire animal" isn't new. It's just that these products are so surprisingly palpable and we expect them to be utterly disgusting.

If you gave me a ligament and brain sandwich and didn't tell me what it was, there's a pretty good chance I'd like it. (As long as it doesn't have capers... I HATE capers.)
 
  • #9
Borg
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This made me laugh - School Pulls All-Beef Burgers From Menu, Citing Complaints

School board member Ryan McElveen, who has pushed for fresh and nutritious food in schools, "said that the change occurred after students noticed that the old patties appeared to be pink in the middle," The Post says.

Noting that Fairfax schools' lunch cafeterias precook their burgers, the newspaper reports "McElveen said it's likely that the all-beef patties did not have a caramel coloring additive."
Sounds to me that they weren't cooking them completely and nobody noticed until real burgers without food coloring were served. Solution: serve the other undercooked burger that just looks like it's been cooked. :rolleyes:
 
  • #10
FlexGunship
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I live on the edge... I like my burgers with a little pink in the middle. And I especially love them served by school cafeteria ladies...
 
  • #11
Pythagorean
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so happy to be living in farm country. My children got to know their chickens before they watched their plucked, decapitated carcasses go into the oven.
 

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