Circuit Explanation: Op Amp Diode Logic

In summary: There is likely some circuitry to keep the output at that level even if Vfilter, or something connected to it, experiences an unexpected voltage drop.
  • #1
DailyDose
25
0
Hey all,
This newb needs help understanding the posted circuit. Real quick, I'm going to post what I understand from left to right.
R53 and R62 = Voltage Divider
D2 = Clamping Diode (Clamping to 3.3V)
R45 = R1 in basic (R2/R1)Vin = Vout op amp formula

This is where I get stuck.
Let's call the node b4 R45 Vin. We would have [(Vin-Vref)/R45] = [(Vref - Vo)/R2] - however no R2. Instead, there's a diode that is in the off (depending on how you look at it) preventing any output from the first op-amp. Where then I guess the second OP Amp equation looks like Vo = [(Vin-Vref)/R45]. I am pretty sure I am missing some inverse logic in all of this, but regardless, I hope I got what I was trying to say across. Click Here for the Op-Amp datasheet. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Namely, what is that diode doing? What's the purpose of this circuit? Thank you.
 

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  • #2
And when I say newb, I am referring to myself.
 
  • #3
U10B work as clamping circuit. The output voltage can changer from 0 to 3V.
Higher voltage will be clamp.
Vout = Vin if Vin<3V, D4 is off and U10B is in positive saturation because inverting input voltage is smaller then non-inverting input.
And if Vin > 3V then Vout = 3V. Now D4 is ON and and closes the negative feedback loop. And non-inverting input is equal to inverting input voltage.
https://www.physicsforums.com/showpost.php?p=3866238&postcount=3
 
Last edited:
  • #4
What is this circuit used in? Do you know what Vfilter comes from?

I miss Altium by the way.
 
  • #5
It's a circuit to monitor the voltage at Vfilter. Presumably the output "Vbat detect" either tells you if flying mammals or superheroes are in the area, or (more likely) that some sort of storage battery (maybe a backup powier supply) that is connected to Vfilter somehow, is outside its correct voltage range. The 3.3V supply for this circuit would be independent of what was being monitored.

To get 3V output from the potential divider, Vfilter would be at 3 x (84.5+5.1)/5.1 = 53V, so presumably that is the critical voltage level for whatever the circuit is monitoring.
 

Related to Circuit Explanation: Op Amp Diode Logic

1. What is an op amp diode logic circuit?

An op amp diode logic circuit is a type of circuit that uses operational amplifiers (op amps) and diodes to perform logical operations. It is commonly used in digital circuits to implement logic functions, such as AND, OR, and NOT.

2. How does an op amp diode logic circuit work?

An op amp diode logic circuit works by using the operational amplifier as a comparator to compare two input voltages. The output of the op amp is then fed into a diode network, which acts as a switch to control the flow of current. Depending on the combination of inputs and the logic function being implemented, the output voltage will be either high or low.

3. What are the benefits of using an op amp diode logic circuit?

One of the main benefits of using an op amp diode logic circuit is its simplicity. It requires fewer components compared to other logic circuits, making it cost-effective and easy to design. It also has a fast response time and can operate at a wide range of input voltages.

4. What are the limitations of an op amp diode logic circuit?

One limitation of an op amp diode logic circuit is that it can only perform basic logic functions and is not suitable for more complex operations. It also has a limited number of inputs and can be prone to errors if the input voltages are not properly controlled.

5. What are some common applications of op amp diode logic circuits?

Op amp diode logic circuits are commonly used in digital systems, such as computers, calculators, and mobile devices. They are also used in electronic devices that require simple logic operations, such as alarm systems, traffic lights, and vending machines.

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