Classical electrodynamics for high-energy physicists

In summary, the conversation discusses a recent textbook on classical electrodynamics that covers special relativity, high-energy topics such as renormalization and massive vector fields, and more speculative topics like gravitational radiation and magnetic monopoles. The book also touches on the concept of magnetic monopoles and their relevance to the discreteness of electric charge. While magnetic monopoles have not been observed, there are some quasiparticles of this kind in exotic materials.
  • #1
Demystifier
Science Advisor
Insights Author
Gold Member
14,192
6,677
I've just found a recent very interesting and very modern textbook on classical electrodynamics. It starts with special relativity (rather than electrostatics) and contains a lot of high-energy topics, including renormalization (within classical realm), massive vector fields, gravitational radiation, electrodynamics of p-branes and magnetic monopoles.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/3319918087/?tag=pfamazon01-20
 
  • Like
  • Informative
Likes smodak, weirdoguy, kith and 4 others
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Magnetic monopoles was big news in the 1970s. I always trust books that discuss the reality of empirically unfounded theories. What else is the book incorrect about?
 
  • Skeptical
Likes weirdoguy and Demystifier
  • #3
Well, theory can also discuss some hypothetical things, like in whether electrodynamics still works, including magnetic monopoles. Is it turns out one can, and as Dirac has shown it interestingly can explain the discreteness of the (Abelian-gauge symmetry) electric charge as a necessity. There's no so strong other argument for the discreteness of electric charge. That's why it's interesting. Of course, today nobody has ever seen an elementary magnetic monopole. The condensed-matter physicists have some quasiparticles of this kind in exotic materials called spin ice.
 
  • Like
Likes George Jones

Related to Classical electrodynamics for high-energy physicists

1. What is classical electrodynamics?

Classical electrodynamics is a branch of physics that studies the interactions between electrically charged particles and electromagnetic fields. It is based on the laws of electromagnetism, including Maxwell's equations, and is used to describe the behavior of electric and magnetic fields in various situations.

2. How is classical electrodynamics relevant to high-energy physics?

Classical electrodynamics is relevant to high-energy physics because it provides a framework for understanding and describing the behavior of electrically charged particles at high energies. This is important for studying phenomena such as particle accelerators, cosmic rays, and nuclear reactions.

3. What are some key concepts in classical electrodynamics for high-energy physicists?

Some key concepts in classical electrodynamics for high-energy physicists include electric and magnetic fields, electromagnetic radiation, Coulomb's law, Lorentz force, and Maxwell's equations. These concepts are used to explain the behavior of charged particles and their interactions with electromagnetic fields.

4. How does classical electrodynamics differ from quantum electrodynamics?

Classical electrodynamics and quantum electrodynamics are two different theories that describe the behavior of electrically charged particles. Classical electrodynamics is based on classical physics principles and is used to study macroscopic systems, while quantum electrodynamics is based on quantum mechanics and is used to study microscopic systems. Quantum electrodynamics is a more complete and accurate theory, but classical electrodynamics is still useful for describing many phenomena in high-energy physics.

5. What are some practical applications of classical electrodynamics in high-energy physics?

Classical electrodynamics has many practical applications in high-energy physics, including the design and operation of particle accelerators, the study of cosmic rays and their interactions with Earth's atmosphere, and the development of nuclear reactors. It is also used in medical imaging techniques such as X-rays and MRI scans, which rely on the interaction between electromagnetic fields and charged particles in the body.

Similar threads

  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
10
Views
3K
  • Poll
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
16
Views
24K
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
5
Views
3K
Replies
2
Views
4K
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
5
Views
12K
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
4
Views
1K
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
1
Views
1K
Back
Top