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Mathematical treatement of electrodynamics

  1. Nov 21, 2009 #1
    I'm looking for something like Arnold's "Mathematical Methods of Classical Mechanics" that applies to electrodynamics/SR/GR. I'd prefer it exterior calculus based.

    So far, I'm leaning towards Thirring:
    https://www.amazon.com/Classical-Ma...=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1258835328&sr=1-1

    Anyone know anything about this Hehl book? It looks like a complete textbook on EM, but using exterior calc:
    https://www.amazon.com/Foundations-...=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1258835308&sr=1-1

    I've gone thru Bamberg/Sternberg's "Course in Mathematics for students of physics", but that doesn't treat much electrodynamics.

    Thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 21, 2009 #2
    Sorry for the off topic question but when you went through Bamberg and Sternberg's book was it for a class which gave solutions to the exercises? I want to go through the book but I do not like not knowing if my answers were right. If it was for a class, I was wondering if it had a website that gave some solutions to problems.

    Again sorry for the off the topic question, but no one has yet to answer my question on another thread, thanks.
     
  4. Nov 21, 2009 #3
    No. I'm just self-studying this on my own, so I don't have any of the solutions to Bamberg/Sternberg.
     
  5. Nov 21, 2009 #4
  6. Nov 21, 2009 #5

    George Jones

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    Both volumes?
     
  7. Nov 21, 2009 #6
    Yes, both volumes. There's a few pages in volume 2 on it, but I was looking for a little deeper treatment. Ideally something ala Jackson but with exterior calculus.
     
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