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Classical Mechanics : Taylor or Morin?

  • Thread starter dreamLord
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  • #26
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I am an undergraduate physics major at Harvard, and this is false. Morin is used in our 1st year Mechanics course. Our intermediate mechanics course (usually taken in the 2nd or 3rd year) uses Goldstein.
And at what level are you expected to be studying? Will an average Harvard 1st year student be able to solve the 3 and 4 star problems?

I'm just trying to gauge how poor the level of my own university is!
 
  • #27
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And at what level are you expected to be studying? Will an average Harvard 1st year student be able to solve the 3 and 4 star problems?

I'm just trying to gauge how poor the level of my own university is!
I don't think we were given any of the four star ones on our problem sets. But the professor would often modify the problems, so it not was not always clear where in Morin they came from. I'd say the typical problem set was about 5 problems, being a mix of two and three stars. We'd also work in groups the night before the assignment was due, so that really helped if you were stuck on something.
 
  • #28
So the general consensus is that Morin is at the Marion-Thornton level?
(as opposed to 'physics for scientists and engineers' level with harder problems, e.g. Kleppner)
 
  • #29
WannabeNewton
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What do you mean by "same level"? If you mean in terms of topics covered then yes they are essentially at the same level. If you mean in terms of difficulty of problems then no, Morin is noticeably more difficult.
 
  • #30
By level, I meant topics covered. I understand that that can have little correlation with difficulty of problems (as you have shown). I previously thought that Morin was in between halliday resnick and MT/taylor as he said in the preface that it was suitable for a freshman level course. thanks for the info.
 
  • #31
WannabeNewton
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I would say that Taylor goes way more in depth on the topics but Morin does go into things like Lagrangian mechanics, vibrational modes, and even some introductory general relativity (which is my most favorite subject in all of physics xP).
 
  • #32
atyy
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I would say that Taylor goes way more in depth on the topics but Morin does go into things like Lagrangian mechanics, vibrational modes, and even some introductory general relativity (which is my most favorite subject in all of physics xP).
At first I read that as "introductory general relativity" is your most favourite subject in all of physics, and I was about to say if what you are interested in is "introductory", then I really wonder what is "advanced general relativity"!
 
  • #33
WannabeNewton
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At first I read that as "introductory general relativity" is your most favourite subject in all of physics, and I was about to say if what you are interested in is "introductory", then I really wonder what is "advanced general relativity"!
lmfao I lol'ed pretty hard at that one
 

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