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Intro Physics Comprehensive beginner maths and physics textbooks?

  1. Feb 18, 2015 #1
    Hey guys,

    So I've recently decided that I will apply to study a Bachelor of Science in 2016, and to spend this year acquiring the prerequisites that I missed when I was in high school. I've been learning maths on Khan Academy, and have just applied to an introductory maths course. After this, I need a senior maths course and a physics course. These are all online, and I have the option to complete them in a quicker time than is given (12 months max.).
    Does anyone have a good recommendation for maths and physics textbooks that could be used to speed along this learning? Khan Academy is great, but I'm looking for as many resources as possible. I'm so excited to study physics, and I would love to be able to apply for semester 1, 2016. What books, if any, helped you the most when you were a beginner?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 18, 2015 #2
    I would suggest you to use basic high school physics and then go over to advanced ones the order that I would suggest for you would be:
    1. Prentice Hall Conceptual Physics
    2. NCERT Science Textbooks (Class 6,7,8,9,10)
    3. NCERT Physics Textbooks (Class 11,12)

    If you are in need of a deep study of the topics, then choose:
    1. Understanding Physics for IIT JEE Main and Advanced By DC Pandey {5 Volumes: (a) Mechanics Vol 1 (b) Mechanics Vol 2 (c) Waves and Thermodynamics (d) Electricity and Magnetism (e) Optics and Modern Physics}
    2. Halliday Resnik and Walker Fundamentals of Physics
     
  4. Feb 18, 2015 #3
    Thanks!
     
  5. Feb 19, 2015 #4

    QuantumCurt

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    Education Advisor

    You don't necessarily need to have any high school physics. Many physics majors don't get their first exposure to the subject until college. The most important thing is to be prepared mathematically. One needs to have knowledge up to and including college algebra and trigonometry to be prepared to start calculus as soon as possible.
     
  6. Feb 19, 2015 #5

    jtbell

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    Staff: Mentor

    That's true in the US, but maybe not in other countries. I suspect Tim1993 isn't in the US, because we don't say "maths."
     
  7. Feb 19, 2015 #6
    Yep, Australia over here. I will need physics to apply, but I am still building my maths foundation, so it may take some time.
     
  8. Feb 19, 2015 #7
    I would like to give you a link. Remember about those NCERT textbooks I said. They provide free ebooks to :
    Please follow this link:
    http://www.ncert.nic.in/ncerts/textbook/textbook.htm
    Select class (or Grade in Australia from 6-12 recommended), select subject (6-10:Science, 11&12 : Physics) select book title(6-10: Science, 11&12:Physics Part I or Part II) For trying out more problems to test yourself You can use previous year question papers available online or the book NCERT Exemplar Problems which also is available online in the same website
    hope the information was useful. If you want more book names or need help in finding the physics chapters in the science books (6-10) please do not hesitate to contact me
     
  9. Feb 19, 2015 #8

    QuantumCurt

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    Education Advisor

    Ah, I didn't catch that. That being the case, disregard most of my post.

    In either case, the most important thing at least at first is to get a solid foundation in basic math. Without having a good working knowledge of algebra and basic trigonometry, even introductory physics will be much more challenging.
     
  10. Feb 24, 2015 #9
    Hi Tim,
    A lot depends on your actual area of interest in Physics. What are you fond of ? Mechanics, Thermodynamics, Electrodynamics, Optics, Quantum Mechanics ? Your future career choice depends on the decision that you are about to make.
     
  11. Feb 24, 2015 #10

    PeroK

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    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    The UK Maths "A-Level" syllabus is comprehensively covered here:

    http://www.examsolutions.net/
     
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