Could our nose and lungs filter tiny paint pieces

  • Thread starter kenny1999
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Main Question or Discussion Point

today I opened a package and unexpectedly there was a lot of tiny white pieces stuff flying out, like dust flying out from old books, but it's certainly not dust. I suspect it's paint pieces fallen from somewhere and don't understand how it gets to the package inside.

Could our nose and lungs filter these tiny paint pieces? Or will they get to our lungs or stay in our nose?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
pinball1970
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Could our nose and lungs filter these tiny paint pieces? Or will they get to our lungs or stay in our nose?
Not my favorite scenario as I have asthma!

We have tiny hairs in our nose and further down our respiratory system that help filter dust and other air borne material. We also produce mucus that can clear away anything that could hurt / infect our lungs. Smoking damages these hairs (just one of the bad things about smoking)

In asthma one can get an overreaction to these dust particles and produce a lot of mucus or initiate a serious of reaction that end up "tightening" the lungs.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lung#Protection
 
  • #3
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Not my favorite scenario as I have asthma!

We have tiny hairs in our nose and further down our respiratory system that help filter dust and other air borne material. We also produce mucus that can clear away anything that could hurt / infect our lungs. Smoking damages these hairs (just one of the bad things about smoking)

In asthma one can get an overreaction to these dust particles and produce a lot of mucus or initiate a serious of reaction that end up "tightening" the lungs.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lung#Protection
How small is the size of the particles our nose can filter?
 
  • #6
phinds
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Sometimes the information on the internet may not be bullet proof to be true. I need more answers.
Uh ... you ARE on the internet. I'll certainly grant you that this forum is more reliable than the average internet site, but for a question as simple as yours I think something like Wikipedia would be fine, and there are medical sites that have detailed info. My point is that it's a good idea to make some attempt on your own before asking questions here.
 
  • #7
jim mcnamara
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https://www.ccohs.ca/oshanswers/chemicals/how_do.html This is the standard explanation for non-scientists.
A quick rundown on the article with some examples.

Note that particle size is a determinate on where and if the particles are deposited. Nasal inhalation filters out more larger particles than does inhaling mouth open. Particle density (number of particles per cm3) in the air inhaled obviously is also a determining factor in how much of a "dose" of something is not expelled, but retained.

The major issue is: what type of particle?
Kind:
Example bad news would be something like fine Chrysolite particles: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asbestos. This very unlikley. Asbestos is a no-no for packaging in most countries.
It was commonly used in auto brake pad linings, so auto repair personnel were exposed to asbestos.
(Black) Mold spores are another problem. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC145304/
Ordinary household mold spores - not a big problem - per same article from NIH.

Size: larger particles are removed more efficiently. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6034084/ This shows how particle size and type can exacerbate existing pulmonary problems.

We have subdued this topic nicely. Thanks everyone for posting.
 

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