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Courses: Nuclear and particle physics?

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  • Thread starter Niles
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Hi all.

Would you believe that it is necessary for me to take a course in "Nuclear and Particle Physics" in order to be able to do graduate work in condensed matter physics/quantum optics?

Thank you in advance.

Best regards,
Niles.
 

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  • #2
malawi_glenn
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well condensed matter physics uses neutron X-ray, so a basic class in Nuclear and Particle physics should do no harm. What are your options?
 
  • #3
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Computational Physics (i.e. programming in FORTRAN) is another option, which I thought of taking. The other is "Condensed Matter Physics", which I will definitely be taking.

When I say "... do graduate work in condensed matter physics/quantum optics ...", then I am thinking of something in the line of either optical physics (i.e. lasers and quantum optics), micro/nano technology, quantum information and stuff like that.
 
  • #4
Vanadium 50
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Necessary? No. A good idea - certainly. It's a good idea to have a broad overview of physics in addition to your area of specialization. Both in general, and because people often end up working outside the area they specialized in - or thought they would specialize in.
 
  • #5
I work in condensed matter theory, and I guarantee that computational physics will be much more valuable to future work in condensed matter. The only caveat is that any course depends strongly on the professor, so if computational is being taught by a mediocre prof and nuclear and particle physics is being taught by a great prof only then would I suggest going for the latter.
 
  • #6
Astronuc
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Hi all.

Would you believe that it is necessary for me to take a course in "Nuclear and Particle Physics" in order to be able to do graduate work in condensed matter physics/quantum optics?

Thank you in advance.

Best regards,
Niles.
Interestingly, there is a text "Nuclear Condensed Matter Physics: Nuclear Methods and Applications"
http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0471954799.html

TOC

Electromagnetic Properties and Nuclear Decay.

Hyperfine Interactions.

Mossbauer Effect.

Perturbed gamma - gamma Angular Correlation (PAC).

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR).

Nuclear Orientation (NO).

Muon Spin Rotation (?SR).

Positron Annihilation.

Neutron Scattering.

Ion Beam Analysis.

The investigation of the properties of condensed matter using experimental nuclear methods is becoming increasingly important. An extremely broad range of techniques is used, including the use of particles, such as positrons and neutrons, ion beams, and the detection of radiation from nuclear decays or nuclear reactions. Nuclear Condensed Matter Physics: Nuclear Methods and Applications is the only book to provide a comprehensive coverage of the nuclear methods used to study the properties of condensed matter. It covers all the key techniques, including the Mossbauer effect, perturbed angular correlation, muon spin rotation, neutron scattering, positron annihilation, nuclear magnetic resonance and ion beam analysis. Numerous examples are given throughout the text to illustrate how each of the experimental methods is used in modern condensed matter physics, and practical details concerning instrumentation are included to help the reader apply each method. Nuclear Condensed Matter Physics: Nuclear Methods and Applications is an invaluable textbook for graduate students of condensed matter physics and chemistry, and is of great interest to those studying materials science and applied nuclear physics. It is also a key reference source for more experienced researchers in these and related fields, including nuclear and condensed matter physicists and solid state and inorganic chemists.
I know that small angle neutron scattering (SANS) is an important tool.

http://www.isis.rl.ac.uk/largescale/loq/documents/sans.htm [Broken]
http://www.ncnr.nist.gov/programs/sans/
http://kur.web.psi.ch/sans1/
http://www.chem.au.dk/~jansp/tools.html [Broken]
. . . .
 
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  • #7
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The reason why I think the computational-course might be better is exactly what ZapperZ always tells me: I agree 100% that it is important to have a broad overview of all physics, but this broad overview wont help me if I do not get into graduate school. But a knowledge of programming (and experience with it) might do me a lot better.
 
  • #8
malawi_glenn
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That is true, you can always go nuclear physics classes when in grad-school if you need them :-)

Programming and problem solving using computer will help you with a lot.
 

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