Covid vaccines - CDC report on associated mortality

In summary, the CDC published a research report on COVID-19 vaccination and non-COVID-19 mortality risk among seven integrated health care organizations in the United States from December 2020 to July 2021. The study aimed to determine if vaccinated individuals had higher non-COVID-19 mortality rates than unvaccinated individuals. The data showed that COVID-19 vaccine recipients had lower non-COVID-19 mortality rates after adjusting for age, sex, race and ethnicity, and study site. This finding suggests that COVID-19 vaccines may have a protective effect against non-COVID-19 mortality. However, the report only shows an association and not causality, and there may be other factors at play. Further research
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jim mcnamara

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TL;DR Summary
During December 2020–July 2021, COVID-19 vaccine recipients had lower rates of non–COVID-19 mortality than did unvaccinated persons after adjusting for age, sex, race and ethnicity, and study site.
https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/70/wr/mm7043e2.htm?s_cid=mm7043e2_w
CDC MMWR report on research: Weekly / October 29, 2021 / 70(43);1520–1524
"COVID-19 Vaccination and Non–COVID-19 Mortality Risk — Seven Integrated Health Care Organizations, United States, December 14, 2020–July 31, 2021"

This research is directed toward answering this:
"Do people vaccinated with Covid vaccine (Pfizer, Moderna, J&J) die from other unrelated causes (Non-covid related , i.e., heart disease, cancer, stroke, etc.) more than unvaccinated people?"

This was a very large set of populations with controls.

Look at table 3 for results. The numbers are age 100 adjusted dates, which is a way to compare deaths rates among populations. The (0.xx-0.yy) data shows mean age 100 value with a confidence interval -- the (0.xx - 0.yy) bit. If the resulting difference is not in a significant CI it show a 1 (1.xx-1.yy) instead of zero. The Pfizer data for the age 11-17 is therefore not significant. J&J has a separate control group because it was given an EUA later than the other two vaccines.

The short answer is:
During December 2020–July 2021, COVID-19 vaccine recipients had lower rates of non–COVID-19 mortality than did unvaccinated persons after adjusting for age, sex, race and ethnicity, and study site.
... for populations in the scope of this report.

The report shows association not causality.
 
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This could be used to calibrate the Covid statistics, i.e. removing the noise of other causes. I don't think that it could prove a correlation due to the vaccines. There are so many factors that affect the numbers that it is impossible to clean the data. E.g.
During December 2020–July 2021, COVID-19 vaccine recipients had lower rates of non–COVID-19 mortality than did unvaccinated persons after adjusting for age, sex, race and ethnicity, and study site.
can simply be the case because people who are vaccinated are in general more risk-averse than unvaccinated people. I keep wearing a mask or two despite the fact that I am vaccinated. Also, Covid avoidance measures like masks or higher hygiene reduce fatalities by flu.

It would be more interesting to see the mortality rates of vaccination breakthroughs depending on the specific vaccines.
 
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fresh_42 said:
It would be more interesting to see the mortality rates of vaccination breakthroughs depending on the specific vaccines.

Here's the overall mortality data from the US:
1636735583876.png

https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tr...me=USCDC_2145-DM69654#rates-by-vaccine-status
 
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1. What are the reported mortality rates associated with Covid vaccines?

The CDC has reported that the mortality rate associated with Covid vaccines is extremely low, with only a small percentage of deaths occurring among those who have been vaccinated. As of September 2021, the CDC has reported a death rate of 0.005% among those who have received the vaccine.

2. Are there any specific demographics or groups that are more at risk for mortality associated with Covid vaccines?

According to the CDC, there is no evidence to suggest that any particular demographic or group is more at risk for mortality associated with Covid vaccines. The majority of deaths reported have been among older adults and those with underlying health conditions, but this is consistent with the mortality rates for Covid-19 in general.

3. What factors may contribute to mortality associated with Covid vaccines?

The CDC has identified a few potential factors that may contribute to mortality associated with Covid vaccines, such as pre-existing health conditions and allergic reactions. However, these are rare occurrences and the benefits of receiving the vaccine far outweigh the risks.

4. How does the mortality rate associated with Covid vaccines compare to the mortality rate of Covid-19 itself?

The mortality rate associated with Covid vaccines is significantly lower than the mortality rate of Covid-19 itself. The CDC has reported a death rate of 0.005% among those who have received the vaccine, while the death rate for Covid-19 is estimated to be around 2.2%.

5. Is there ongoing monitoring and research being conducted on the mortality associated with Covid vaccines?

Yes, the CDC and other organizations are continuously monitoring and researching the mortality associated with Covid vaccines. This includes tracking any adverse reactions and conducting studies to further understand the potential risks and benefits of the vaccines.

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