Curious what the take is around here on antidepressants

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  • #26
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erm, hey look, sorry... i didn't mean to make this another "gale's whining about her life" thread. i've been depressed a long time. i've had an unhappy childhood, and a generally less than happy life. mostly, i'm certain, due to my own perspective and attitude. i definetly think that i'm capable of a better life than i'm living, and i think that my refusal for drugs has maybe been not the best idea. i want to get better. so i just want to know how people feel about the drugs.

also, how do you guys feel about people who have to take those drugs? maybe its just me, but i always sort of viewed them as weak... unable to function without meds seems... less than whole... you know what i mean? like... i don't want to have to dependent on something outside me inorder to be normal... makes me feel.. well.. abnormal. and thats depressing...

i think i'm also very worried about that suicide thing.
 
  • #27
Astronuc
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i'm just a big waste of space, with no purpose or direction.
Not quite. You seem a bright, intelligent, and sensitive person.

Also, you do not seem to be frontin' with friends here at PF.

So, what's next?

BTW - I placed out of my freshman year and started uni with sophomore math and physics courses. I was loading with 20+ hrs.

Well, I flamed out gloriously by the end of my sophomore year. Tried to recover in the first part of junior year, but then took off a semester to get my head together. Altered states and severe sleep deprivation didn't help at that point, actually they precipitated the decline.

I tried for a 4th year, but quit that school and went elsewhere.

So hang in there. OK?

How's things with home?
 
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  • #28
Danger
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Gale17 said:
also, how do you guys feel about people who have to take those drugs? maybe its just me, but i always sort of viewed them as weak... unable to function without meds seems... less than whole...
I'm a bit biased, since I'm one of them... but so are a few others around here that seem to be functioning just fine with whatever they're using for treatment. The main thing to keep in mind that it has nothing to do with willpower or anything else under conscious control. It's a specific chemical malfunction in the body, just like diabetes or schizophrenia. You can't be expected to deal with it alone.
 
  • #29
Moonbear
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Gale17 said:
erm, hey look, sorry... i didn't mean to make this another "gale's whining about her life" thread. i've been depressed a long time. i've had an unhappy childhood, and a generally less than happy life. mostly, i'm certain, due to my own perspective and attitude. i definetly think that i'm capable of a better life than i'm living, and i think that my refusal for drugs has maybe been not the best idea. i want to get better.
We want you to get better too. :smile: There's no need to be sorry for reaching out for help when you need it. It's important to know when to ask for help, and takes a lot of courage to do it.

so i just want to know how people feel about the drugs.

also, how do you guys feel about people who have to take those drugs? maybe its just me, but i always sort of viewed them as weak... unable to function without meds seems... less than whole... you know what i mean? like... i don't want to have to dependent on something outside me inorder to be normal... makes me feel.. well.. abnormal. and thats depressing...
Would you feel oddly about someone who needed to take medication to control their blood pressure or cholesterol or diabetes? It's not a weakness to need medication. For a long time, people didn't understand depression or know that it has physical causes, so it became somewhat stigmatized. Nowadays, we know differently, and realize it's something treatable. Nobody should have to feel crappy all the time when there's a medication to make them feel better. Just wait until you start feeling better and get out of the funk you're in, you won't believe you waited so long to do something about it.

i think i'm also very worried about that suicide thing.
I'm worried about that too. We really treasure having you around here. Can you schedule an appointment with your therapist very soon?
 
  • #30
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Astronuc said:
How's things with home?
BAD! if anyone's looking for a roommate, and wouldn't mind a 17 yr old female who's a bit off... let me know. seriously.

Danger said:
I'm a bit biased, since I'm one of them... but so are a few others around here that seem to be functioning just fine with whatever they're using for treatment. The main thing to keep in mind that it has nothing to do with willpower or anything else under conscious control. It's a specific chemical malfunction in the body, just like diabetes or schizophrenia. You can't be expected to deal with it alone.
I dunno... i don't like medicines for any "diseases" or "disorders" .... i know its not rational, but i mean, the body... nature... just doesn't seem right to add pills and shots and all that stuff. i do sort of... i dunno... i should change my views i guess.... but i dunno. i'd also like a tummy tuck or a boob job... and thats also so unnatural... i just... how do you draw the line? i dont want to take things that change who i am. god made me this way. or nature made me this way... for a reason eh? i dunno... i'm just so miserable... its hard to stick to my guns.
 
  • #31
Danger
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Gale17 said:
i dont want to take things that change who i am. god made me this way. or nature made me this way... for a reason eh? i dunno... i'm just so miserable... its hard to stick to my guns.
Keep in mind that a large part of your attitude about that could very well be a symptom of the disorder as well. A lot of schizophrenics who go off of their meds because they feel better don't want to go back on because they think that they're still fine even as they deteriorate.
 
  • #32
Moonbear
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Gale17 said:
I dunno... i don't like medicines for any "diseases" or "disorders" .... i know its not rational, but i mean, the body... nature... just doesn't seem right to add pills and shots and all that stuff. i do sort of... i dunno... i should change my views i guess.... but i dunno. i'd also like a tummy tuck or a boob job... and thats also so unnatural... i just... how do you draw the line? i dont want to take things that change who i am. god made me this way. or nature made me this way... for a reason eh? i dunno... i'm just so miserable... its hard to stick to my guns.
It can be tough to admit to yourself that you need it. Sometimes our bodies just misfire and we can't just fix ourselves and we want to think we can. There's no reason for you to be miserable all the time. Though, since you're going through it, once you're feeling better, you'll be more understanding of how others feel as well. Maybe it'll be another student in your dorm who needs help, or an employee of yours someday, or just some person you meet in an airport who is at the point you're at now and needs someone understanding to talk to...you can be that person who understands them and helps them get the help they need. That's what the experience is good for, and getting better is the first step toward making something good come out of it.
 
  • #33
dextercioby
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Gale,did you misspell the word in the title on purpose...?If not,then maybe you should start taking anitdepressants.

I'm seriosu.

Daelin.
 
  • #34
Lisa!
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That's strange.I can never trust pills or psychologist about curing spychological problems.I think we should learn to take life easy.Try to laugh in difficult situations.when I'm depressed,I usually think about what makes me sad or sometimes write them and I feel better.I read my notes which I wrote in the same situation and think about how my concerns weren't as bad as I thought.how problems've solved by passing time.and I sometimes in hard situations say to myself "crying or not won't make any difference.so smile and be happy.Thanks to God, we don't have to live in this world forever.The whole world is a joke.let's feel ourselves beside God and laugh at it like him"and then I feel better.
 
  • #36
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Lisa! said:
That's strange.I can never trust pills or psychologist about curing spychological problems.I think we should learn to take life easy.Try to laugh in difficult situations.when I'm depressed,I usually think about what makes me sad or sometimes write them and I feel better.I read my notes which I wrote in the same situation and think about how my concerns weren't as bad as I thought.how problems've solved by passing time.and I sometimes in hard situations say to myself "crying or not won't make any difference.so smile and be happy.Thanks to God, we don't have to live in this world forever.The whole world is a joke.let's feel ourselves beside God and laugh at it like him"and then I feel better.
That's the difference between the kind of episodes of sadness that don't need medication, when you can just find something to do to feel better on your own, and the type of clinical depression that requires medication because you can't just snap yourself out of it.
 
  • #37
JamesU
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this thread is depressing :frown:

*goes to find zoloft bottle*
 
  • #38
hypnagogue
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Gale17 said:
also, how do you guys feel about people who have to take those drugs? maybe its just me, but i always sort of viewed them as weak... unable to function without meds seems... less than whole... you know what i mean? like... i don't want to have to dependent on something outside me inorder to be normal... makes me feel.. well.. abnormal. and thats depressing...
I think this attitude is fairly common, but it kind of strikes me as an outdated folk psychology view. It seems to stem from the idea that human will power is infinite and/or the idea that the mind is separate from the brain; basically, 'mind over matter.' But things don't really work like that. If you build a house based on a faulty set of physical laws, the house will probably collapse. Likewise, if you try to act as if conscious thoughts and intentions alone are enough to leap any mental hurdles, you're only setting yourself up for a fall. Will power is not unlimited by any stretch (if it were, dieting would be easy and everyone who wanted to be skinny would be). And of course, the mind is subject to all sorts of mechanisms and conditions in the brain, and sometimes those mechanisms need a little tweaking or tune-up for everything to run optimally.

Look at it this way... is there any shame in an old man using a cane to help him walk? Is his cane use indicative of an inherent character flaw or personal weakness? Of course not. There are just simple physical conditions presented to him in life which present to him a challenge. To overcome that challenge, he needs to change his existing conditions, so he uses the cane. What is the greater character flaw-- to concede that he needs some assistance given his current situation, or to struggle needlessly to do something as simple as walking? I'm not saying will power is completely ineffectual or that any attempt at all at self-reliance should be abandoned or anything like that, but it's certainly the wiser path to know, respect, and accept one's own limitations than to ignore them and struggle a needless struggle in vain.

As for being dependent on things outside yourself to be whole... this is not something to be ashamed of at all! If you think about it, everyone is already this way, all the time. On the biological level, we need to constantly support our bodies with food and drink; on the social level, we need love, acceptance, companionship, etc. from others, without which no one can be a healthy human being, let alone a whole one; and so on. So everyone, without exception, needs a constant stream of these things from outside of themselves in order to sustain them and make them whole. Some groups of people have needs that are unique with respect to the population at large, but that's not something to be looked down upon. Diabetics need to take insulin shots because their bodies just don't regulate certain chemicals in an optimal way. Should they feel ashamed or outcast because of that? Are they diabetic because they're weak-willed or in some way not whole as a person? Of course not. The situation of a diabetic who needs to take insulin is really not all that different from the situation of someone who could benefit from taking an anti-depressant.
 
  • #39
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you're right hypnagogue...
the belief is sorta an outdated folk thing i guess... when i was young and very impressionable, my parents were delving into pseudo-hippy-new-age stuff... i ended up with some weird unfounded beliefs...

i dunno... you're right though, and the cane was a good example. its still just hard in today world to know the limits of whats helping us, and what's going too far. Thanks, really. your posts was super helpful, and really, thanks.

anyways Lisa, like moonbear said, there's a difference. its not just a sadness resulting from some misfortunate situation, its just this overwhelming sense of unhappy. most people tend to think i'm very optimistic, and mostly i am. when i face a problem, i make the best of it mostly, (at home its a bit harder...) but the thing is, when i'm "depressed" there's really no cause or trigger. there's nothing to look on the bright side of. i can have millions of reasons to smile... but it just doesn't matter.

i hope this is a learning experience, and that i'll be able to relate to others late on. a few years ago i had no one to talk to at all when i first started getting very seriously depressed. friends just didn't understand. it was lonely. i'm at least glad that i can post in here. and i want to do what i can for anyone else who has to experience this. its so much harder going through it alone, and so i hope that my going through it will help me to console others.

I'm still really worried about medicines. but i'll call the doc's tomorrow for an appt. when asking about meds, are there any specific questions i should ask?

(btw yomamma: not helpful...)
 
  • #40
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Gale17 said:
I'm still really worried about medicines. but i'll call the doc's tomorrow for an appt. when asking about meds, are there any specific questions i should ask?
Of course you should ask any question that comes to mind or that concerns you. Ask about what you should expect to experience as the medicine starts working and how long it will take to work. Someone much earlier in the thread mentioned it can take 4-6 weeks to reach full effectiveness, so you should know to expect this if that's the case for the one they prescribe you. Ask the doctor to explain why he/she is putting you on the one they choose, and how it works (just a good way to make sure they are thinking about what they are prescribing and not giving you whatever the most recent drug rep was pushing). You should also ask what the major side effects might be and if they are a problem, whether there's a different medication that won't have those side effects. Also find out about what happens if it doesn't work, is it safe to just stop the medication and start a new one, or should you gradually reduce the dose and have a clearance time before starting something new (some linger in the system a while, so you can't just switch to something different until you've been off the old one a while). Oh, and of course check on any drug interactions (your pharmacist might be able to answer that better than the doctor even), even for anything over-the-counter. These are just the general types of questions to ask about any new medication.
 
  • #41
Lisa!
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Moonbear said:
That's the difference between the kind of episodes of sadness that don't need medication, when you can just find something to do to feel better on your own, and the type of clinical depression that requires medication because you can't just snap yourself out of it.
Yes,you're right but I think we should try not to get involved in these kind of depression.we should do sth about our depression before it turns to be serious that we would have to use medication.but anyway,I really disagree with medication!
 
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  • #42
Danger
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Lisa! said:
I think we should try not to get involved in these kind of depression.we should do sth about our depression before it turns to be serious
You're still not quite grasping what it is that we're talking about here. It's not something that can be prevented just by knowing about it ahead of time, any more than something like MS or macular degeneration. For now, pharmaceutical treatment is the only thing that can be done (and that includes any 'natural' remedies, since they contain the same active ingredients as the commercial ones).
 
  • #43
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Lisa! said:
Yes,you're right but I think we should try not to get involved in these kind of depression.we should do sth about our depression before it turns to be serious that we would have to use medication.but anyway,I really disagree with meditation!
That's a really outdated view of depression, along the lines of what hypnagogue discussed. We now know that there are very physical aspects of clinical depression involving problems with neurotransmitters in the brain. If it's the type of depression that requires medication, there is nothing that will help prevent that. Please re-read what Gale has written here. She's not talking about a little case of the blues because she's bored or missing her friends from school now that it's summertime, she's talking about something that has been a long-term problem and seems to be overwhelming her at the present time. It's somewhat insensitive and unhelpful to suggest it was preventable when it isn't.
 
  • #44
Lisa!
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Danger said:
You're still not quite grasping what it is that we're talking about here. It's not something that can be prevented just by knowing about it ahead of time, any more than something like MS or macular degeneration. For now, pharmaceutical treatment is the only thing that can be done (and that includes any 'natural' remedies, since they contain the same active ingredients as the commercial ones).
maybe you're right coz today I'm so busy :cry: and I haven't read all replies.You know somhow thes kind of deseases seem to be incurable right now.I know lots of examples of people who are involved in .and I have to say even medication couldn't help you.you know I can't explain my ideas about this case now maybe I do it later.
 
  • #45
Lisa!
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Moonbear said:
That's a really outdated view of depression, along the lines of what hypnagogue discussed. We now know that there are very physical aspects of clinical depression involving problems with neurotransmitters in the brain. If it's the type of depression that requires medication, there is nothing that will help prevent that. Please re-read what Gale has written here. She's not talking about a little case of the blues because she's bored or missing her friends from school now that it's summertime, she's talking about something that has been a long-term problem and seems to be overwhelming her at the present time. It's somewhat insensitive and unhelpful to suggest it was preventable when it isn't.
Oh that's so bad.I really don't want to agree with you about unpreventable deseases.I consider that people who have a normal life and of course personality don't get involved in these kind of problems.
 
  • #46
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Lisa! said:
Oh that's so bad.I really don't want to agree with you about unpreventable deseases.I consider that people who have a normal life and of course personality don't get involved in these kind of problems.
Moonbear said:
<snip> It's somewhat insensitive and unhelpful to suggest it was preventable when it isn't.
Lisa, look, you really really aren't helping, and i'm not feeling super spectacular, so please, just... stop being counterproductive. please.
 
  • #47
Danger
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Sometimes you can alleviate some of the worst symptoms temporarily by just laughing. It sounds a bit weird, but the process really does alter dopamine levels to some extent. Something that you can't help finding funny can make you feel better for a while (maybe at least enough to get to sleep easier). I highly recommend a hilarious movie or two. Marx Brothers, perhaps, or something like Blazing Saddles. Maybe a George Carlin album. Anyhow, I gotta check out now. Goodnight.
 
  • #48
Astronuc
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Lisa! said:
Oh that's so bad.I really don't want to agree with you about unpreventable deseases.I consider that people who have a normal life and of course personality don't get involved in these kind of problems.
I have yet to meet a person who has a "normal life".

Two other aspects to keep in mind - diet and sleep.

Poor diet can affect one's mind. If one's food is deficient in certain vitamins, particulaly B-complex, it will affect one's mental state. Consider taking either a multi-vitamin (1 per day) or B-complex. But don't overdo it - too much of certain vitamins can be harmful. Discuss this with a doctor.

Sleep - irregular sleep cycles or sleep deprivation will induce depression. Try to sleep on a regular basis.

In both cases, poor diet and irregular sleep can develop a negative feedback with depression.
 
  • #49
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It could be good conquering it mentally. Because while medication *can* sooth it for a while, there will never be a permanent antidote.
 
  • #50
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Bladibla said:
It could be good conquering it mentally. Because while medication *can* sooth it for a while, there will never be a permanent antidote.
The medication is a tool to handle the situation, get motivated again about class and your future and sort out personal matters. It's important to deal with that stuff, otherwise the feelings will come back when you stop the medication (people who just come off anti-depressants are a high risk population).

I don't think there is anything wrong with taking anti-depressants if it is really making you lathergic to the point you can't function anymore. I'd first try counceling though! See if talking and opening up about your problems make you feel better about yourself, that is the ultimate goal.
 

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