Current on a perfectly conducting plane

In summary, "Current on a perfectly conducting plane" refers to the flow of electric charge on a surface with no resistance. It differs from current on a regular conductor in that it experiences no loss of energy. The relationship between current and voltage on a perfectly conducting plane is directly proportional. It is not affected by external magnetic fields and has real-life applications in superconducting materials.
  • #1
unhorizon
17
0
Quick question:

The current on a perfectly conducting plane of infinitessimally small thickness is equal to H on one side of the plane minus H on the other side, right?

Thanks!
-Matt
 
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  • #2
True, for type I and type II superconductors (ignoring Meissner effect and Cooper pair dimensions) if you meant current density.
Bob S
 
  • #3


Yes, that is correct. According to Maxwell's equations, the current density on a perfectly conducting plane is equal to the difference in magnetic field (H) on either side of the plane. This is due to the fact that a perfectly conducting plane has an infinite conductivity, meaning that there is no resistance to the flow of current. Therefore, any change in magnetic field on one side of the plane will immediately cause a corresponding change in current on the other side. I hope this answers your question.
 

Related to Current on a perfectly conducting plane

1. What is the definition of "current on a perfectly conducting plane"?

"Current on a perfectly conducting plane" refers to the flow of electric charge on a surface that has no resistance to the movement of electrons. This means that the current is not hindered or slowed down by the material of the surface, allowing it to flow freely.

2. How is current on a perfectly conducting plane different from current on a regular conductor?

The main difference is that a perfectly conducting plane has zero resistance, while a regular conductor has some amount of resistance. This means that current on a perfectly conducting plane will not experience any loss of energy, while current on a regular conductor will experience some loss due to resistance.

3. What is the relationship between current and voltage on a perfectly conducting plane?

On a perfectly conducting plane, the current is directly proportional to the applied voltage. This means that if the voltage is doubled, the current will also double. This relationship is known as Ohm's law and holds true for any material with zero resistance.

4. Can current on a perfectly conducting plane be affected by external magnetic fields?

No, current on a perfectly conducting plane is not affected by external magnetic fields. This is because the electrons are able to freely move without any resistance, so they are not deflected by the magnetic field. This property is important in applications such as superconductors.

5. What are some real-life examples of current on a perfectly conducting plane?

Some examples include superconducting materials, such as certain metals and alloys, which have zero resistance at very low temperatures. This allows for efficient transmission of electricity in power lines and can also be used in sensitive electronic devices, such as MRI machines and particle accelerators.

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