Damage by tire blowing up at 203 mph

  • B
  • Thread starter Tachyon son
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Damage Tire
In summary, the energy involved in a tire spinning at those speeds is massive enough to create these damage. However, what kind of energy is exactly the one which directly produces that body rip? Rotational kinetic energy? Centrifugal?
  • #1
Tachyon son
38
2
Hi all,

We have a discussion among friends after this video:


For sure the energy involved in a tire spinning at those speeds is massive enough to create these damage:
7a2e792s-960.jpg

87c0e52s-480.jpg


But what kind of energy is exactly the one which directly produces that body rip?
Rotational kinetic energy?
Centrifugal?
Thanks a lot.PS: That tire is spinning circa 40 revolutions per second at that speed.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Tachyon son said:
But what kind of energy is exactly the one which directly produces that body rip?
Rotational kinetic energy?
Centrifugal?
Once the tire comes apart, it seems most convenient to treat its pieces as individually having kinetic energy due to their motion. Since we are talking about damage to the [much more massive] car, one would use their kinetic energy in the car's rest frame.

On the other hand, if the fragments retain coherence, they will individually be spinning. If for instance, a large portion of the tire carcass is spinning, detached from the wheel, I would agree that rotational kinetic energy seems a more appropriate notion.

Of course, both are the same number.

Centrifugal force is not a form of energy.
 
  • Like
Likes Lnewqban
  • #3
That kind of damage seems to be produced by the whipping effect of lenghts of fabric-rubber long pieces that remain attached to the rim (via steel ring in bead of tire) while it is still able to rotate supplying some torque.
Note the interior side of the tire's ring still attached to the rim, although it moved to the exterior side.

This is also an all-wheel-drive car, which may have had power being supplied to that right front tire at time of rupture.
If so, being suddenly unloaded, the rpm's of that rim could have reached a higher value via the differential.
That engine is able to provide more than 450 HP, while the body material close to that tire is light but not very strong against impact.

Please, see:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nissan_GT-R

:cool:
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Likes russ_watters

1. What causes a tire to blow up at 203 mph?

There are several factors that can contribute to a tire blowing up at high speeds. These include over-inflation, under-inflation, worn out tires, and debris on the road that can cause punctures or damage to the tire.

2. Can the speed of the vehicle affect the likelihood of a tire blowing up?

Yes, the speed of the vehicle can greatly increase the chances of a tire blowing up. The higher the speed, the more heat and stress is put on the tire, making it more susceptible to failure.

3. How can tire blowouts be prevented at high speeds?

To prevent tire blowouts at high speeds, it is important to regularly check and maintain proper tire pressure, rotate tires regularly, and replace worn out tires. It is also important to avoid driving on roads with debris or hazards that can cause damage to the tire.

4. What are the potential dangers of a tire blowing up at 203 mph?

A tire blowing up at 203 mph can be extremely dangerous for both the driver and other vehicles on the road. It can cause loss of control of the vehicle, leading to accidents and injuries. It can also cause damage to the vehicle and other surrounding objects.

5. Can tire blowouts be predicted or detected before they happen?

While there are some warning signs of a potential tire blowout, such as vibrations or bulging tires, they are not always easy to detect. Regular tire maintenance and inspections can help identify potential issues before they become a major problem, but tire blowouts can still occur unexpectedly.

Similar threads

Replies
86
Views
4K
Replies
13
Views
1K
Replies
9
Views
911
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
10
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
661
Replies
17
Views
17K
Replies
6
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
2K
  • Other Physics Topics
Replies
2
Views
1K
Back
Top