Density of Saturated Vapor R-134a

In summary: In summation, the program is off by less than 0.5% on the published data for liquid density, liquid volume, and saturated pressure for R-134a.
  • #1
Nugget_Mon
6
0
Hi all,

Just for fun I am writing a program in Octave for calculating the thermodynamic properties of R-134a. I am using the equations in the Dupont properties booklet.
http://www2.dupont.com/Refrigerants/en_US/products/Suva/Suva134a.html

My functions for calculating the liquid density, liquid volume(of course), and the saturated pressure are less than 0.5% off of the published data.
My question is what am I missing to calculate the saturated vapor properties?

Thank You,
MON
 
Engineering news on Phys.org
  • #2
You can find the saturated properties of "regular" R134a here: http://webbook.nist.gov/chemistry/fluid/, but I'm not sure what the difference is between standard R134a and the dupont one, which seems to be made to function more effectively as a replacement in R12 systems.
 
  • #3
Right, I have that link as well.
I can use the tables effectively, and I have found the properties at the conditions I needed (55/100)degF. My question is one of curiosity at this point. How to calculate it programmatically.
 
  • #4
Using an equation of state such as what is published in this paper - http://scitation.aip.org/getpdf/servlet/GetPDFServlet?filetype=pdf&id=JPCRBU000023000005000657000001&idtype=cvips&prog=normal
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #5
Bump.
 
  • #6
What, our answers weren't good enough? Don't just bump the thread, elaborate what it is you're still looking for
 
  • #7
I guess I must have a subscription at work for the link I provided earlier, but a quick google search reveals that http://www.nist.gov/srd/PDFfiles/jpcrd480.pdf. Again, that is the equation of state for R134a that several computer programs use for property data.
 
  • #8
Sorry about the delay. My question with the MBWR equation of state was determining the Volume from inside the summation. I can't directly solve for it, so I am assuming I need to put it into a guess and check routine until the error falls into an acceptable range?
 

Related to Density of Saturated Vapor R-134a

1. What is the density of saturated vapor R-134a?

The density of saturated vapor R-134a is approximately 1.21 kg/m3 at 25 degrees Celsius and 1 atm pressure.

2. How does the density of saturated vapor R-134a compare to other refrigerants?

The density of saturated vapor R-134a is relatively low compared to other refrigerants, such as R-22 or R-410a. This means that a larger volume of R-134a is needed to achieve the same cooling effect.

3. Does the density of saturated vapor R-134a change with temperature?

Yes, the density of saturated vapor R-134a varies with temperature. As the temperature increases, the density decreases and vice versa.

4. How does the density of saturated vapor R-134a affect its performance as a refrigerant?

The density of saturated vapor R-134a plays a significant role in its performance as a refrigerant. A lower density means that it can absorb more heat energy, making it more efficient at cooling. However, it also means that it requires a larger volume to achieve the desired cooling effect.

5. Can the density of saturated vapor R-134a be used to determine its pressure?

Yes, the density of saturated vapor R-134a can be used to determine its pressure using the ideal gas law: P = ρRT, where P is pressure, ρ is density, R is the gas constant, and T is temperature.

Similar threads

  • Mechanical Engineering
Replies
8
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
20
Views
3K
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Mechanical Engineering
Replies
2
Views
3K
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
10
Views
1K
  • Mechanical Engineering
Replies
1
Views
1K
Replies
25
Views
3K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
8K
  • Classical Physics
Replies
13
Views
9K
Back
Top