Deriving Laser Intensity proportional to N Molecules

In summary: Laser-based Quantification of Molecular Concentrations%20via_Reflected_Light%20with_A_Pump_Module%20(2011)
  • #1
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I recall hearing that if you have a sample of N molecules, then the output of a laser consisting of this sample has intensity proportional to N. I've been looking for such a derivation but cannot find one, and am wondering if this is still true. It seems somewhat intuitive but my intuition isn't always right. Any references/explanations would be greatly appreciated!
 
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  • #2
TheCanadian said:
I recall hearing that if you have a sample of N molecules, then the output of a laser consisting of this sample has intensity proportional to N. I've been looking for such a derivation but cannot find one, and am wondering if this is still true. It seems somewhat intuitive but my intuition isn't always right. Any references/explanations would be greatly appreciated!

Am struggling to understand what you are talking about ... maybe others are as well, hence the lack of responses

can you please expand on what you are referring to
is it a situation of firing a laser at a sample of something and using the reflected / refracted laser light to determine the sample composition ?
or something completely different ... please put you question into context :smile:

Dave
 
  • #3
davenn said:
Am struggling to understand what you are talking about ... maybe others are as well, hence the lack of responses

can you please expand on what you are referring to
is it a situation of firing a laser at a sample of something and using the reflected / refracted laser light to determine the sample composition ?
or something completely different ... please put you question into context :smile:

Dave
I READ it as a question about a lasing sample. So if a mole of CO2 is in a laser, it has a certain efficiency, and a certain maximum output. And then 2 moles of CO2 would have twice as many photons produced. That certainly seems intuitively to make sense to me as well.
 
  • #4
votingmachine said:
I READ it as a question about a lasing sample. So if a mole of CO2 is in a laser, it has a certain efficiency, and a certain maximum output. And then 2 moles of CO2 would have twice as many photons produced. That certainly seems intuitively to make sense to me as well.

Exactly. It seems very intuitive and I'm just wondering if there any particular sources confirming this is the case.
 
  • #5

1. What does it mean for laser intensity to be proportional to the number of molecules?

This means that as the number of molecules increases, the intensity of the laser beam also increases. This relationship is linear, meaning that if the number of molecules doubles, the laser intensity will also double.

2. How is the proportionality between laser intensity and number of molecules determined?

The proportionality between laser intensity and number of molecules is determined by experimental measurements. Scientists can vary the number of molecules in a sample and measure the resulting laser intensity to determine the relationship between the two.

3. What factors can affect the proportionality between laser intensity and number of molecules?

The proportionality between laser intensity and number of molecules can be affected by factors such as the type of molecule, the wavelength of the laser, and the concentration of the molecules. These factors can alter the absorption and emission of the molecules, thus impacting the intensity of the laser beam.

4. How is the proportionality between laser intensity and number of molecules used in scientific research?

The proportionality between laser intensity and number of molecules is used in a variety of scientific research fields, particularly in spectroscopy and molecular dynamics studies. It allows scientists to measure and track the behavior and interactions of molecules in a sample.

5. Is the proportionality between laser intensity and number of molecules valid for all types of molecules?

No, the proportionality may vary for different types of molecules. Some molecules may have stronger or weaker absorption and emission properties, leading to a different relationship between laser intensity and number of molecules. Additionally, the proportionality may also depend on the type and strength of the laser being used.

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