I Detectable wavelengths of light at the surface of the Earth

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I am sure this will become a 'face-palm' moment, but can anyone point me in the direction of what electromagnetic energy wavelengths on either side of the visible spectrum, that is detectable on earth, ie what is not filtered by our atmosphere? I am specifically trying to find information on the wavelength spectrum of infrared light that hits the earths surface.
Thanks.
 

pinball1970

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I am sure this will become a 'face-palm' moment, but can anyone point me in the direction of what electromagnetic energy wavelengths on either side of the visible spectrum, that is detectable on earth, ie what is not filtered by our atmosphere? I am specifically trying to find information on the wavelength spectrum of infrared light that hits the earths surface.
Thanks.
A quick Google will give you info on this. About 50% of light that reaches the earth's surface is infra red according to searches. I'm surprised by that, I would have thought longer wavelengths would be more readily absorbed by the atmosphere.
 

pinball1970

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I am sure this will become a 'face-palm' moment, but can anyone point me in the direction of what electromagnetic energy wavelengths on either side of the visible spectrum, that is detectable on earth, ie what is not filtered by our atmosphere? I am specifically trying to find information on the wavelength spectrum of infrared light that hits the earths surface.
Thanks.
Nice diagram
 

davenn

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I'm surprised by that, I would have thought longer wavelengths would be more readily absorbed by the atmosphere.

A lot of IR is absorbed by atmospheric moisture. That is why IR telescopes are built on very high mountain tops to get above most of the atmospheric water vapour ... eg. the one on top of Mauna Kea

from my visit there in 1999
nasa_infrared_scope.jpg
 

phyzguy

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The image below, from this site, shows where the Earth's atmosphere is transparent enough for observations. This site has more detail on what component of the Earth's atmosphere is doing the absorption in the IR.

spect002.gif
 

pinball1970

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A lot of IR is absorbed by atmospheric moisture. That is why IR telescopes are built on very high mountain tops to get above most of the atmospheric water vapour ... eg. the one on top of Mauna Kea

from my visit there in 1999
View attachment 245756
My son visited the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope in Hawaii last year but did not get the data he needed as it was clouded over for 10 days pretty much. Go to Hawaii and get Manchester weather...

Anyway I should have noted the '1.what is solar radiation' in the link I posted to the original OP.
It explains all the levels at sea and atmospheric level including UV and infra red.
 

davenn

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y son visited the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope in Hawaii last year but did not get the data he needed as it was clouded over for 10 days pretty much. Go to Hawaii and get Manchester weather...

Was probably during the hurricane season LOL ..... the summit was closed when I was there last year as well because of Hurricane Lane :frown:
 

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