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Distance light travels in a relatively moving frame?

  1. Oct 23, 2011 #1
    I was wondering if say.. you have a particle moving at 0.5c in the +x direction and a lightbulb at relative rest to the particle.
    The particle passes the lightbulb at t[itex]_{0}[/itex]
    The lightbulb then flashes, the wave reaches the particle at a particular point, and the speed of light is then measured (by the particle) to be c. Does this then mean that the light wave will then travel a distance of ct from that point in the reference frame of the particle; t being any point in time that the particle wishes to measure the distance of the light wave from it.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 23, 2011 #2

    Doc Al

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    Staff: Mentor

    If the particle and lightbulb are at relative rest, how can they pass each other?
     
  4. Oct 23, 2011 #3
    Oh am I using the wrong terminology? I meant to say that the particle is moving with 0.5c compared to the lightbulb.
     
  5. Oct 23, 2011 #4

    Doc Al

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    Staff: Mentor

    OK.
    Yes.
     
  6. Oct 23, 2011 #5
    Thanks Doc Al, that's helped clear up confusion.
     
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