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Do graduate schools (Physics) care if youre a 5th year undergrad?

  1. Jun 25, 2011 #1
    Title says it all. I've heard some schools don't like 5th year undergrads, is there a general truth to this from what you guys have heard, if you ever have?

    Thanks ^^
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 25, 2011 #2
    I should also mention I'm a double major.
     
  4. Jun 26, 2011 #3

    Choppy

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    There's no truth to it that I'm aware of.

    Of course, a lot can depend on circumstances. If you took 5 years to complete your undergrad because you flunked out or had to repeat a few courses, that's not going to look good on your application. If you took 5 years because you had to work full time to afford it, took more than a standard number of courses, or did a co-op program, it's unlikely to have any bearing on the application.
     
  5. Jun 28, 2011 #4

    bcrowell

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    Getting a degree in 4 years is starting to sound quaint. Here in California, students at state schools can't get the courses they need to graduate in 4 years, simply due to the state budget crisis. It kills me when students work 40 hours a week and take 22 units, on the theory that they "can't be in school forever" -- then they fail half their classes and have to repeat them.
     
  6. Jun 28, 2011 #5
    I don't think graduate schools care, and it's far better to do it in 5 years with a solid degree then try to rush things in 4 years and then have a less than stellar application.
     
  7. Jun 28, 2011 #6
    Thanks for the replies everyone. I guess I've heard a load of bullocks then. I figured completion time doesn't matter as much as how your grades, GRE, which courses you've taken (grad courses perhaps), etc.
     
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