Does a Negative Charged Conductor Ice Pail Lose Charges When Touched Inside?

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In summary, the conversation is about a negative charged conductor (ice pail) placed on an isolated support. The question being discussed is whether the pail will lose its charges if it is touched or if something is placed inside it. The person asking the question is looking for a discussion and explanation, but has not received any comments or responses. They provide a picture of the experiment they are trying to understand, involving two conductors (K and Z) with different charges. The final question is what will happen when the switch is closed and what type of charge will be left on the conductors. The person expresses frustration at not being able to understand the concept and asks for clarification.
  • #1
Volcano
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Suppose have a negative charged conductor ice pail over an isolated support. If a touch of dip or elsewhere inside, does pail lose charges?
 
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  • #2
I can not understand. Thirty member reading but zero comment. My fundamental question is waiting few days. I know my English is not enough to explain well. But come on, so incomprehensible? My question is not a joke or only curiosity. If you know something about this, please share with me. Let's discuss.

In fact this may learn by doing this experiment but neither have devices nor explain myself. I will try to explain my question for last time. This is the figure:

http://img127.imageshack.us/my.php?image=hollowed3lp9.jpg

K and Z conductor. qk=-3q and qz=+2q. What happens after switch closed. What is the final type of charge over K and Z. I don't ask amounts, + or - for both and how.

I do not want to believe this is a not understandable or a hard question.

Regards
 
  • #3


Yes, the pail will lose its negative charges if it is touched by a dip or any other object inside it. This is because the negative charges on the conductor will flow towards the object that touched it, neutralizing the charges on the pail. This process is known as grounding and it occurs when a conductor is connected to the ground or a larger conductor, allowing the charges to flow and equalize. In this case, the hollowed cylinder acts as the ground for the negative charges on the pail. Therefore, the pail will lose its charges and become neutralized.
 

Related to Does a Negative Charged Conductor Ice Pail Lose Charges When Touched Inside?

1. What is a hollowed cylinder grounded?

A hollowed cylinder grounded is a type of electrical conductor that is shaped like a hollow cylinder and is connected to the ground to provide a safe path for electrical currents.

2. How is a hollowed cylinder grounded used in electrical systems?

In electrical systems, a hollowed cylinder grounded is used to prevent electrical shocks and damage to equipment by diverting excess electricity into the ground.

3. What materials are typically used for a hollowed cylinder grounded?

The most commonly used materials for a hollowed cylinder grounded are copper, aluminum, and steel. These materials are good conductors of electricity and are strong enough to withstand the forces of grounding.

4. How does a hollowed cylinder grounded differ from other grounding methods?

A hollowed cylinder grounded differs from other grounding methods, such as grounding rods or plates, because of its shape and surface area. The hollowed cylinder design provides a larger surface area for the electricity to dissipate, making it more effective in diverting excess electricity.

5. What are the benefits of using a hollowed cylinder grounded?

There are several benefits to using a hollowed cylinder grounded, including improved safety, protection of electrical equipment, and compliance with building codes and regulations. It can also reduce the risk of electrical fires and improve the overall efficiency of the electrical system.

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