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Does the graviton move at the speed of light in any reference frame?

  1. May 20, 2010 #1

    jaketodd

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    Does the graviton move at the speed of light in any reference frame?

    Thanks,

    Jake
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 20, 2010 #2

    Demystifier

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    Yes, provided that the speed (or more precisely, velocity) is defined in a general-relativistic covariant way.
     
  4. May 21, 2010 #3
    Is there a Graviton?

    Cheers
     
  5. May 24, 2010 #4
    In the standard model it says that there could be such thing as a graviton. But i would think that if a photon is moving at the cosmological constant (speed of light), then all elementary gauge bosons would be moving that same speed.
     
  6. May 25, 2010 #5

    tom.stoer

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    I would not insist on the term "graviton" as it contains some speculations about the quantization of gravity - which is by no means complete. Instead I would talk about a "gravitational wave", which always travels at the speed of light (provided that ... refer to Demystifier)
     
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