Does thermal radiation involve ultraviolet x ray and jamma ray

In summary: Basically, this person is saying that the amount of radiation across all wavelengths is the same for a few different temperatures, and that the radiation is typically infra-red. They also mention that the sun is just less than 6000K, so a lot of its radiation is visible to the human eye. Finally, they mention that there aren't any 'jamma' rays.
  • #1
taregg
70
0
does thermal radiation involve ultraviolet x ray and jamma ray or just heat of light...
 
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  • #2
It involves all of them. Some more than others though.

The image below shows the amount of radiation across all wavelengths for a few different temperatures.

As you can see, the vast majority is infra-red, and this is normally the typical 'thermal radiation' heat you talk of. Only when something gets reaaaally hot does it start to emit most of its energy as visible light.

For reference, the sun is just less than 6000K, so a lot of its radiation is visible to the human eye.

black-body-radiation-curves.png
 
  • #3
There aren't any 'jamma' rays. There are 'gamma' rays (with a hard 'g')

Unless you pledged 'Phi Slamma Jamma' in college.
 
  • #4
Haha. The more worrying thing is that this person is surely just spelling it how it sounds. And if they think it says 'jamma', then that must be the way their teacher is saying it to them...!
 
  • #5
sa1988 said:
Haha. The more worrying thing is that this person is surely just spelling it how it sounds. And if they think it says 'jamma', then that must be the way their teacher is saying it to them...!

If that's the case, how do you explain the (correct) double m? May be the j is just a typo?
 
  • #6
dauto said:
If that's the case, how do you explain the (correct) double m? May be the j is just a typo?

Well...

My logic was a silly and jestful wild guess in the first place, but if you'd like an explanation then I'll add that I was going on the assumption that maybe this person (or their teacher) had thought the word was pronounced 'jamma', which is definitely a possibility, considering the ways the letter 'g' can sometimes be pronounced.

And in the pronunciation of 'jamma', it's surely only natural to spell it with a double m.
 
  • #7
In English ga, go, gu are all pronounced with a hard g. ge and gi are usually pronounced with a soft g, but not always.
 
  • #8
Indeed! But not everybody knows this.
 
  • #9
mathman said:
In English ga, go, gu are all pronounced with a hard g. ge and gi are usually pronounced with a soft g, but not always.

OMG Whatever you do, never try to find 'rules' for English Pron(o)unciation. English is sooo irregular, it will drive you mad.
 
  • #10
It is also instructive to see the spectrum of black body radiation, given in terms of frequency rather than wavelength.
See this YouTube video.
Note the scale that's used here, which stretches the low frequencies and compresses the high frequencies, before trying to come to any numerical conclusion.
 

Related to Does thermal radiation involve ultraviolet x ray and jamma ray

1. Does thermal radiation involve ultraviolet light?

Yes, thermal radiation can involve ultraviolet light. Thermal radiation is a type of electromagnetic radiation, and the spectrum of electromagnetic radiation includes ultraviolet light.

2. What about x-rays and gamma rays?

Yes, thermal radiation can also involve x-rays and gamma rays. These are also forms of electromagnetic radiation and can be emitted as part of thermal radiation from hot objects.

3. Is thermal radiation dangerous?

Thermal radiation itself is not inherently dangerous. However, if it includes high levels of ultraviolet, x-ray, or gamma radiation, it can be harmful to living organisms. This is why protective measures, such as sunscreen and lead shielding, are necessary in situations where thermal radiation may be present.

4. Can thermal radiation be used for anything?

Yes, thermal radiation has many practical applications. It is used in everyday devices such as ovens, heaters, and light bulbs. It is also used in industries such as metallurgy, where it is used for welding and melting metals, and in medical imaging, where infrared thermal cameras can detect abnormalities in the body's temperature.

5. How does thermal radiation differ from other forms of heat transfer?

Thermal radiation is one of three modes of heat transfer, along with conduction and convection. While conduction and convection involve the transfer of heat through physical contact or movement of particles, thermal radiation involves the transfer of heat through electromagnetic waves. Additionally, thermal radiation can occur in a vacuum, while conduction and convection require a medium for heat transfer.

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