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B Does time run slower or faster in a magnetic field?

  1. Dec 22, 2015 #1
    Does time run slower or faster in a magnetic field?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 22, 2015 #2

    BvU

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    No. Why should it ?
     
  4. Dec 22, 2015 #3
    It was just a question. BTW, how do you know this?
     
  5. Dec 22, 2015 #4
    No reason. It was just a thought. BTW, how do you know this to be fact?
     
  6. Dec 22, 2015 #5

    russ_watters

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    Look into Einstein's Relativity theory(s). Motion and gravitational fields affect the rate as compared between different observers. That's it.
     
  7. Dec 22, 2015 #6
    I know a gravitational field does but how does that apply to magnetic fields?
     
  8. Dec 22, 2015 #7

    russ_watters

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    It doesn't. "That's it" means those are the only two things that affect the rate of the passage of time.

    [edit]
    Perhaps a little more detail:

    People have been studying (successfully) how time works for about a hundred years. It was discovered to be dimension somewhat similar to length. And gravity is a manifestation of a curving/bending of those dimensions. Magnetism doesn't do that.

    There is a caveat to that, though. Since matter and energy are related/proportional to each other, anything that has energy gravitates. So in that way a strong field can affect time, indirectly.
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2015
  9. Dec 22, 2015 #8
    Wonder if anyone has ever tested time in a magnetic field?
     
  10. Dec 22, 2015 #9

    russ_watters

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    I'm not sure if it has been tested directly. Unfortunately, failed ideas often get somewhat lost/harder to find how they were tested.
     
  11. Dec 22, 2015 #10
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2015
  12. Dec 22, 2015 #11
    There are some interesting answers here.
    http://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/100279/does-strong-magnetic-field-cause-time-dilation

    According to general relativity. it would seem that any field with energy, stress, pressure, etc, can affect the passage of coordinate time; Proper time, that which you measure locally, remains unchanged. Your own wristwatch continues to tick at its normal steady, fixed pace. Hence coordinate clocks should run a smidgen slower in sunlight than in dark....way too small to be measured I would think.....How about in the vicinity of a hugely strong permanent magnet?
     
  13. Dec 22, 2015 #12
    Aren't there some unified field theories that unite the gravity, electro-weak, and strong nuclear forces?

    One of those theories might be able to make a prediction pertaining to the O.P.s question. I doubt I would understand the answer, but some here might. If someone here knows those theories well enough to dumb it down for us laymen, I would be interested / greatfull for the insight.
     
  14. Dec 22, 2015 #13
    good thought, but not yet:

    "..... a theoretical framework revealing a deeper underlying reality, unifying gravity with the other three interactions, must be discovered to harmoniously integrate the realms of GR and QFT into a seamless whole: a single theory that, in principle, is capable of describing all phenomena. In pursuit of this goal, quantum gravity has recently become an area of active research.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theory_of_everything
     
  15. Jun 7, 2016 #14
    Since we have been trying to understand gravity's mechanism for more than 200 years maybe it is a function of some other phenomena like the warping of time due to mass instead of the warping of time due to gravity?
     
  16. Jun 7, 2016 #15

    Dale

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    Closed for moderation

    Edit: this will remain closed. I recommend to study in depth the metric mentioned in post 11. That (and the theory behind it) really say everything that is known about the topic.
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2016
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