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Doubt regarding definition of magnetic susceptibility

  1. Dec 5, 2011 #1
    Intensity of magnetisation(I) is defined as the magnetic moment per unit volume of the material. It represents the extent to which a specimen is magnetised.

    I=M/V

    Magnetising force or magnetising intensity(H) is defined as the number of ampere turns flowing round unit length of toroidal solenoid to produce the magnetic induction B, in the solenoid.
    It represents the degree to which a magnetic field can magnetise a material.

    H=nI

    Magnetic susceptibility (Xm) of materials is defined as the ratio of intensity of magnetsiation of that material to the magnetising intensity of the magnetic field.
    It represents the ease with which a specimen can be magnetised.

    Xm=I/H

    My question is, according to the definitions and what they represent, of I and H, if I and H are large, doesn't it mean that the extent to which the specimen is magnetised , and the degree to which a magnetic field can magnetise the specimen, are more? In that case, that would make magnetic susceptibility more since the specimen can be more easily magnetised. Then how come according to the formula, is H is more, Xm is less? Is there something missing in the definition, or something wrong in my understanding?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 7, 2011 #2
    I don't think this statement is accurate: [What is your source???? ]

    It represents the degree to which a magnetic field can magnetise a material.
     
  4. Dec 7, 2011 #3
    These definitions and what they represent, were copied out of my school textbook. It seems to me, that the definitions and what they represent, are contradicting the mathematical definition. So is what they have written as 'what the quantities represent', wrong?
     
  5. Dec 8, 2011 #4
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