E = Em sin(kx-wt) and I = T+R what wavelength is reflected wave

In summary, when a light wave enters a medium, the electric field value of the wave decreases in the medium. The relationship between the incident wave, transmission wave, and reflected wave can be described using the formula E = Em sin (kx=wt) where k = 2 pi/wavelength. This formula can also be used to determine the wavelength of the reflected wave if the electric field of the reflected wave is known. This question is related to a thread on a physics forum and is asking if the electric field value of the reflected wave can be obtained using the formula E reflected wave = E incident wave - E transmitted wave - E absorbed wave, and if so, if the wavelength of the reflected wave can be determined using the given formulas
  • #1
morrobay
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When a light wave enters a medium the electric field value of the wave is smaller in the medium.
With the incident wave = transmission wave + reflected wave. If the E field of the
reflected wave is known . Can the wavelength of the reflected wave be obtained from
these relationships :
E = Em sin (kx=wt)
k = 2 pi/wavelength
This question is related to this thread https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=463293
 
Last edited:
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  • #2
morrobay said:
When a light wave enters a medium the electric field value of the wave is smaller in the medium.
With the incident wave = transmission wave + reflected wave. If the E field of the
reflected wave is known . Can the wavelength of the reflected wave be obtained from
these relationships :
E = Em sin (kx=wt)
k = 2 pi/wavelength
This question is related to this thread https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=463293

If this question is stated correctly does it have an answer ?
If not stated correctly can someone restate w/correction
Asking if the electric field value of the reflected wave is known based on:
E reflected wave = E incident wave - E transmitted wave - E absorbed wave
Then can wavelength of reflected wave be obtained from above formulas.
 
Last edited:
  • #3
The wavelength of the reflected wave is the same as the incident wave. Photon energy is not changed on reflection.
 

1. What is the meaning of "E = Em sin(kx-wt) and I = T+R"?

E = Em sin(kx-wt) and I = T+R are equations used in the study of waves, specifically electromagnetic and light waves. The first equation represents the electric field of a wave, where Em is the maximum electric field strength, k is the wave number, x is the position of the wave, w is the angular frequency, and t is the time. The second equation represents the intensity of a wave, where T is the transmitted intensity and R is the reflected intensity.

2. What is the relationship between the electric field and intensity of a wave?

The electric field and intensity of a wave are directly proportional. This means that as the electric field strength increases, the intensity of the wave also increases. The intensity of a wave is a measure of its energy, so a stronger electric field results in a more intense wave.

3. How is wavelength related to the reflected wave in the equations E = Em sin(kx-wt) and I = T+R?

In these equations, the wavelength is represented by the value of k, the wave number. The reflected wave will have the same wavelength as the incident wave, meaning that the value of k will be the same in both equations. This is because the wavelength of a wave does not change when it reflects off a surface.

4. Can you explain the meaning of the variables in the equation E = Em sin(kx-wt)?

As mentioned before, E represents the electric field strength, and Em is the maximum value of the electric field. The variable k is the wave number, which is related to the wavelength of the wave. The variables x and t represent the position and time, respectively, and are used to track the location and movement of the wave.

5. How can I use these equations to calculate the intensity of a reflected wave?

To calculate the intensity of a reflected wave, you will need to know the values of T and R, as well as the maximum electric field strength (Em) and the wave number (k). You can then plug these values into the equation I = T+R to find the total intensity of the wave. Keep in mind that the intensity of the reflected wave will be less than the intensity of the incident wave, as some of the energy is reflected off the surface.

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