Electric circuit -- Ohm's second law

In summary, the conversation discusses the existence of Ohm's second law and how it differs from Ohm's first law. The speaker, who has experience in circuit design, has not heard of Ohm's second law and suggests that the name of the law is not as important as the information it conveys. The speaker also makes a guess about what Ohm's second law might be based on their knowledge of Ohm's first law.
  • #1
MARIAM507
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Homework Statement
I want to know ohm's second law i search many times about it but every time the result is about ohm's first only, so can anyone help me??
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I want to know ohm's second law i search many times about it but every time the result is about ohm's first only, so can anyone help me??
 
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  • #2
I had not previously heard of ohms second law. As near as I can tell, one takes ohms "first" law and divides each side by R. Not very interesting...but useful
 
  • #3
MARIAM507 said:
Homework Statement:: I want to know ohm's second law i search many times about it but every time the result is about ohm's first only, so can anyone help me??
Doesn't the fact that you can't find anything with a search give you a clue that there IS no such thing?
 
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  • #4
I worked in the field of analog, control, and power supply circuit design for about 30 years and I never heard of "Ohms 2nd law", so I guess I can't help.

What I can say though is that it isn't the name of the law that matters, it's the information conveyed. I still couldn't tell you with certainty which is Newton's 2nd law of motion vs. his 3rd law. But I do know the material, and that's what matters.

Then, as a wild guess, I'd say that if ohm's first law is V=I⋅R, then his second law is probably I=V/R. Ohm didn't do much else in the world of physics or electronics; as far as I know, anyway.
 

Related to Electric circuit -- Ohm's second law

1. What is Ohm's second law?

Ohm's second law, also known as Kirchhoff's voltage law, states that the sum of all voltage drops in a closed circuit is equal to the sum of all voltage sources.

2. How is Ohm's second law different from Ohm's first law?

Ohm's first law states that the current through a conductor is directly proportional to the voltage and inversely proportional to the resistance. Ohm's second law, on the other hand, deals with the overall voltage in a closed circuit.

3. How is Ohm's second law applied in real-life circuits?

Ohm's second law is used to analyze and design complex electrical circuits, such as those found in electronic devices, power grids, and telecommunications systems. It helps engineers and scientists understand the behavior of voltage sources and voltage drops in a circuit.

4. What are some common misconceptions about Ohm's second law?

One common misconception is that Ohm's second law only applies to simple series circuits. In reality, it can be applied to any closed circuit, regardless of its complexity. Another misconception is that voltage drops must always equal voltage sources, but this is not always the case in circuits with multiple branches.

5. How can I use Ohm's second law to troubleshoot a circuit?

Ohm's second law can be used to identify potential issues in a circuit by comparing the expected voltage drops to the measured voltage drops. If there is a significant difference, it could indicate a faulty component or a wiring problem. It can also help determine the appropriate voltage sources to use in a circuit to achieve the desired results.

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