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Electrical consumption of appliances

  1. Sep 3, 2015 #1
    I like to know the basic understanding of the consumption of various appliances used at home.
    thanks.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 3, 2015 #2

    meBigGuy

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    Can you be more specific. Ask a specific question about 1 appliance (but ask the same question on google before posting it here). If you still have questions, elaborate them succinctly.
     
  4. Sep 3, 2015 #3
    thanks for the input @meBigGuy, let's suppose the the air conditioner 1.5 ton as an appliance, if running for an hour, how much electricity it consumes ?
     
  5. Sep 3, 2015 #4

    meBigGuy

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    Why do you want me to look that up on google for you? Why are you asking this question?

    Look at a typical commercial 1.5 ton AC unit and see how much power it draws.

    For example a 1.5KW 1.5 ton AC will consume 1.5KWhrs in 1 hr.

    https://www.quora.com/How-much-electricity-units-is-used-by-1-5-ton-split-AC [Broken]

    You need to do that yourself for all the appliances you are interested in.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2017
  6. Sep 3, 2015 #5
    I came across this quora thread couple of days back, I got the corresponding point.
    But I like to understand the basics used in electricity to have good intuition, if you could mention any source for better intuition of basic of electricity, would be worth visiting pf.

    once again thx. for ur views.
     
  7. Sep 3, 2015 #6

    Averagesupernova

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    Good intuition comes with experience. No on can answer a single question and give you a lifetimes worth of intuition.
     
  8. Sep 3, 2015 #7
    Look up the user manual for various appliances - also they should all have name plates. If you are looking for actual energy consumption vs ratings it is too general of a question. An AC in a poorly insulated house will consume more energy than in a well insulated house. Another option is look up some generator sizing charts - they will list typical loads.
     
  9. Sep 3, 2015 #8

    sophiecentaur

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    If you have very little knowledge of Electrical Engineering and AC systems then why not take the advice of a local installer (check credentials first) and ask for a quotation for a suitable system? It would be a much cheaper alternative if all you need is a comfortable premises.
     
  10. Sep 3, 2015 #9
    thanks for your views
    @Averagesupernova
    @Windadct
    @sophiecentaur
    It helped the query to resolve. what I meant in my original question was, to get the better understanding of the terms used in electricity (volts, watts, ampere etc. normally encounters), what source of info. can be used to get good level of intuition to get comfortable with ?
     
  11. Sep 4, 2015 #10

    sophiecentaur

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    This is a lot to ask for, actually. The thing about most of Science is that it's like Maths and there is a lot of counter-intuitive stuff in it. You will already appreciate that the basic rules of Arithmetic and Algebra are not actually 'intuitive' but need to be learned and practices so that they come as 'second nature' to the user. They are not actually intuitive (except in retrospect, when you have already learned them.) EE is the same.
    Getting to grips with the basics of EE will involve learning quite a few formulae and being able to apply them to 'real' situations. When you do it this way, you will be struck, on many occasions, that 'the answer' is not what you would have intuitively jumped to. Getting cause and effect in the right order can only come with frequent use and practice.
    Personally, I do not get on with using the analogy with water flow, that you will come across on many of the sources that you can find on the web and I would advise you to treat them carefully. That approach will let you down in the end. Try to find stuff that doesn't base its ideas on WATER FLOW.
    This link has the form of a suitable set of lessons and, if you work your way through them (answering at least some of the questions at the end of each section!!!) you could get a reasonable grounding in the topic. But I must emphasise that you will need to put in some serious effort if you want to nail this. PF can always help with specific questions, of course.
     
  12. Sep 7, 2015 #11
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