Electrical Energy Dissipation Across Resistors

In summary: Remember that voltage is a signed quantity and can be positive or negative depending on the direction of the current flow. In summary, the conversation is about finding the total rate of electrical energy dissipation in different resistors and the power output of a battery. The solution involves finding the voltage difference and resistance, summing up voltage sources and resistances in a loop, and taking into account the direction of the voltages.
  • #1
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Homework Statement



(image attached)
A). What is the total rate at which electrical energy is dissipated in the 5.0−Ω resistor?
B). What is the total rate at which electrical energy is dissipated in the 9.0−Ω resistor?
C). What is the power output of the 16.0-V battery?
D). At what rate is electrical energy being converted to other forms in the 8.0-V battery?


Homework Equations



P=V_ab(I)=I^2R=V_ab^2/R

The Attempt at a Solution



I can't figure this out at all. For part A, I need the voltage difference and the resistance. How would I find the voltage difference? And does the 5 ohm resistor mean that the resistance is 5 over the resistor? In which case I need to find the voltage drop across the resistor. How do I do this?
 
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  • #2
no image attached
 
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  • #3
Sorry, attached it now!
 

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  • #4
Just sum up all of the voltage sources around the loop and all the resistances, since they're all in series, and you'll have the current around the loop. Can you take it from there?
 
  • #5
Ok, so I added up the voltages (24V) and added up the resistance (17 ohms). I then did V/R to get I=1.412A. Then, I used the equation P=V_ab * I and got P=120W, but it is wrong. What am I doing here?
 
  • #6
You are not taking into account the direction of the voltages.
 

1. What is electrical energy dissipation?

Electrical energy dissipation refers to the process by which electrical energy is converted into other forms of energy, such as heat or light, when it passes through a resistor.

2. How does energy dissipation occur across resistors?

Energy dissipation occurs across resistors due to the resistance of the material, which causes the electrons to collide with the atoms and lose energy in the form of heat. This results in a decrease in the electrical energy of the current passing through the resistor.

3. What factors affect the rate of energy dissipation across resistors?

The rate of energy dissipation across resistors is affected by the resistance of the material, the current flowing through the resistor, and the voltage applied across the resistor. A higher resistance, current, or voltage will result in a higher rate of energy dissipation.

4. How is energy dissipation measured in resistors?

Energy dissipation in resistors is measured in watts (W), which is the standard unit of power. This measurement can be calculated using the formula P = I^2 * R, where P is power, I is current, and R is resistance.

5. What are some practical applications of understanding electrical energy dissipation across resistors?

Understanding electrical energy dissipation across resistors is important in the design and use of electronic devices. It allows for the selection of resistors with appropriate resistance values to avoid overheating and potential damage to the circuit. It is also useful in the design of energy-efficient devices, as minimizing energy dissipation can lead to lower power consumption.

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