Electricity Saving and Me, also about blown fuses.

  • Thread starter High_Voltage
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In summary, your 20 amp fuse is blowing because you are drawing too much current. You can check the power usage of your appliances to determine the amount of current they draw and ensure they are not overloading the circuit. Using a power strip does not affect the current being drawn. Power companies determine your usage by reading your power meter at regular intervals and send you a bill accordingly. If you are blowing fuses without any appliances plugged in, there may be a fault that needs to be fixed by an electrician.
  • #1
High_Voltage
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The fuse in my House continues to blow. The fuse rating is 20 amps. I can easily make the fuse so that it can't blow out but I know that might heat the wires in the wall if I draw too much current, and can cause an electrical fire. I am wondering, If I get a high grade durable power strip(er)(nah! JK) and put my appliances in parallel will that help the fuse problem.

I am also wondering how power companies know how much power you use, and If I put appliances in parallel will they draw more current?
 
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  • #2
Your fuse is blowing because you are taking too much current through it.

You could check how much current different appliances draw. Look for a tag on the appliance that gives the power they use. Divide this by your supply voltage (120 volts if you are in the US) and this will give you the current.

These currents add up and if they are on the same circuit they may blow a fuse.

You always use appliances in parallel, even if they come from a power board.

If you are blowing fuses without anything plugged in, you may have a fault somewhere and need to get an electrician to fix it for you.

Your house would have a power meter and this is read at regular intervals by someone from the power company. They subtract the previous reading from the new one to work out how much power you have used. Then they send you a request that you pay them money or else they will disconnect your electricity supply and sue you for the money.
 

Related to Electricity Saving and Me, also about blown fuses.

1. How can I save electricity in my home?

There are several ways to save electricity in your home. Some simple tips include turning off lights and electronics when not in use, using energy-efficient light bulbs, and unplugging chargers when not in use. You can also save energy by using appliances with the Energy Star label and by properly insulating your home.

2. What are some common causes of blown fuses?

Blown fuses are often caused by overloading a circuit, which can happen when too many appliances or electronics are plugged into the same outlet. Short circuits, faulty wiring, and power surges can also cause blown fuses.

3. How do I know if a fuse is blown?

If a fuse is blown, you may notice that the affected circuit is not receiving power. You can also check the fuse by removing it from the fuse box and looking for any visible signs of damage, such as a blackened or melted appearance.

4. How can I prevent blown fuses?

To prevent blown fuses, make sure to not overload circuits and to use the appropriate fuse for each circuit. Regularly checking and replacing old or damaged fuses can also help prevent blown fuses.

5. Can I fix a blown fuse myself?

It is possible to fix a blown fuse yourself, but it is important to proceed with caution and to follow proper safety precautions. If you are unsure or uncomfortable with fixing a blown fuse, it is best to call a licensed electrician for assistance.

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