Electromagnetic Induction and Faraday's Law w/ Right Hand Rule

In summary: Once we know the direction of induced current, the electric force (electric field caused by changing magnetic field which causes the induced current is along the direction of the charge particle which is leftwards since the current is moving left at the top if the induce current is counterclockwise.
  • #1
lorx99
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0

Homework Statement



upload_2018-11-9_10-52-0.png

Homework Equations


Right Hand Rule

The Attempt at a Solution



I am not understanding why the force is left. I can only figure out that the current in the solenoid is moving clockwise because of the right hand rule. From there, I see that the induced current might be counterclockwise , but i am not sure why the positive point charge moves left.
 

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  • #2
Contemplate Faraday's Law.
 
  • #3
gneill said:
Contemplate Faraday's Law.
Is it moving left because the induced current is clockwise and so the electric force is left at tbat point or some other reason?
 
  • #4
What precisely does Faraday's Law state?
 
  • #5
gneill said:
What precisely does Faraday's Law state?
The emf produced is equal to the negative rate of change in flux
 
  • #6
Right. An emf (electric field) is produced. That's what would drive a current in a loop surrounding the changing magnetic field. The emf exists in space regardless of whether or not an actual wire occupies the space.

So imagine that there's loop passing through where the charge is. If the charge was in that loop, which direction would it be 'motivated' to go?

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  • #7
gneill said:
Right. An emf (electric field) is produced. That's what would drive a current in a loop surrounding the changing magnetic field. The emf exists in space regardless of whether or not an actual wire occupies the space.

So imagine that there's loop passing through where the charge is. If the charge was in that loop, which direction would it be 'motivated' to go?

View attachment 233728
Oh i think i understand. Does this involve len's law to figure out the direction of the induced current?

Once we know the direction of induced current, the electric force (electric field caused by changing magnetic field which causes the induced current is along the direction of the charge particle which is leftwards since the current is moving left at the top if the induce current is counterclockwise.
 
  • #8
All correct!
 
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Related to Electromagnetic Induction and Faraday's Law w/ Right Hand Rule

What is electromagnetic induction?

Electromagnetic induction is the process of generating an electric current in a conductor by moving it through a magnetic field or by varying the magnetic field around it.

What is Faraday's Law?

Faraday's Law states that the induced electromotive force (EMF) in a closed loop is directly proportional to the rate of change of magnetic flux through the loop. In other words, the greater the change in magnetic flux, the greater the induced EMF.

What is the Right Hand Rule in relation to electromagnetic induction?

The Right Hand Rule is a way to determine the direction of the induced current in a conductor. It states that if you point your thumb in the direction of motion of the conductor and your fingers in the direction of the magnetic field, then your palm will face the direction of the induced current.

What is Lenz's Law?

Lenz's Law is a consequence of Faraday's Law and states that the direction of the induced current will always be such that it opposes the change in magnetic flux that produced it. This means that the induced current creates its own magnetic field that opposes the change in the original magnetic field.

What are some real-world applications of electromagnetic induction and Faraday's Law?

Electromagnetic induction and Faraday's Law are used in various technologies such as generators, transformers, and electric motors. They are also used in everyday devices, such as induction cooktops and wireless chargers for electronic devices.

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