Electromagnetic spectrum/(dark)matter/4 fundamental forces

In summary, the four fundamental forces in physics are gravity, electromagnetic, strong interaction and weak interaction. The electromagnetic spectrum is basically waves with photons (photons in all of the different ones, such as gamma and radio waves??). The next one up is beta waves (electrons) and then alpha waves (some kind of helium with bits missing iirc?). Matter has a half-life and eventually decomposes, looping back to the EM spectrum. The four fundamental forces are combined to form the electroweak interaction. The Higgs mechanism is part of the electroweak interaction or as some separate interaction. Strong and weak interaction have a huge effect over greater distances, but might not actually be what's pushing the galaxies apart. dark matter might be what
  • #1
paulo84
112
7
OK, I need some help understanding some stuff.

The way I see it: you've got 4 fundamental forces in physics right? I believe these are gravity, electromagnetic, strong interaction and weak interaction.

The electromagnetic spectrum is basically waves with photons (photons in all of the different ones, such as gamma and radio waves??). Once you reach one end of the spectrum, as in gamma rays, the next one up is beta waves (electrons) and then alpha waves (some kind of helium with bits missing iirc?). Here you're already essentially talking about matter. But, is a photon counted as matter?

OK so the EM spectrum seems to be extending into matter along gamma/beta/alpha waves. And, we know energy and matter are interchangeable anyway. But eventually, all matter decomposes - has a half-life. And then does it revert back into the EM spectrum? Is it actually like a EM/matter spectrum which might actually be a circle or a horseshoe rather than just a spectrum?

Because like, the radioactive metals that last for a fraction of a second before they decompose, well that's where I'd see this spectrum looping back on itself... or am I crazy?

And then back to the 4 fundamental forces... and dark matter... how do scientists know that say strong or weak interaction don't actually have a huge effect over greater distances (how would you measure that??) and might actually be what's pushing the galaxies apart rather than dark matter? could be an inverse effect...

sorry if it's all a little crazy or inaccurate in places...
 
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  • #2
paulo84 said:
gravity, electromagnetic, strong interaction and weak interaction.
Okay.
paulo84 said:
you reach one end of the spectrum, as in gamma rays, the next one up is beta waves
No.
Here's result from Google --- https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q="em+radiation" --- work your way through a half dozen or dozen articles --- then try rephrasing one or two questions at a time.
 
  • #3
paulo84 said:
The way I see it: you've got 4 fundamental forces in physics right?
Depends on the way you count. The electromagnetic interaction and weak interaction can be combined to the electroweak interaction.
The Higgs mechanism can be seen as part of the electroweak interaction or as some separate interaction.
paulo84 said:
Once you reach one end of the spectrum, as in gamma rays, the next one up is beta waves (electrons) and then alpha waves (some kind of helium with bits missing iirc?).
No, not at all.
paulo84 said:
But eventually, all matter decomposes - has a half-life.
There are stable particles.
paulo84 said:
Because like, the radioactive metals that last for a fraction of a second before they decompose, well that's where I'd see this spectrum looping back on itself... or am I crazy?
That doesn't make sense.
paulo84 said:
how do scientists know that say strong or weak interaction don't actually have a huge effect over greater distances
Something like planets would not exist if they would have an effect over large distances (where large means larger than the size of an atom).
paulo84 said:
and might actually be what's pushing the galaxies apart rather than dark matter?
Dark matter is not pushing galaxies apart. Dark matter is attractive and keeps galaxies together. Dark energy is pushing galaxies apart from other galaxies.

I agree with Bystander: start reading about those topics before you make up wild speculations and questions that are based on too many misconceptions for a proper answer.
 
  • #4
OK, thanks, I'll try and get back to you, I really need to either do some reading or talk to an experienced physicist in real life... would prefer the latter but may not be possible for a while.
 

Related to Electromagnetic spectrum/(dark)matter/4 fundamental forces

1. What is the electromagnetic spectrum?

The electromagnetic spectrum is the range of all possible frequencies of electromagnetic radiation, including radio waves, microwaves, infrared radiation, visible light, ultraviolet radiation, X-rays, and gamma rays.

2. What is (dark) matter?

Matter is anything that has mass and takes up space. Dark matter is a type of matter that does not interact with light or other electromagnetic radiation, making it difficult to detect. It is believed to make up about 85% of the total matter in the universe and is responsible for the gravitational effects that we observe in space.

3. What are the 4 fundamental forces?

The 4 fundamental forces are gravity, electromagnetism, the strong nuclear force, and the weak nuclear force. These forces are responsible for all interactions between particles and govern all physical processes in the universe.

4. How does the electromagnetic spectrum affect our daily lives?

The electromagnetic spectrum plays a crucial role in our daily lives. Radio waves are used for communication, microwaves are used for cooking, visible light allows us to see, and X-rays and gamma rays are used in medical imaging and radiation therapy. Without the electromagnetic spectrum, our modern way of life would not be possible.

5. What is the relationship between (dark) matter and the 4 fundamental forces?

The 4 fundamental forces are responsible for the interactions between particles, including those of dark matter. However, dark matter does not interact with the electromagnetic force, making it difficult to detect and study. The exact relationship between dark matter and the other fundamental forces is still not fully understood and is an area of ongoing research in the field of particle physics.

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