Engineering physics vs. aerospace engineering

In summary, the conversation discusses the potential career paths and financial opportunities for individuals with degrees in engineering and an MBA. It is mentioned that engineers typically make it to the upper middle class, but may not be highly valued in executive positions within a company. The speaker shares their own experience as an engineer and their future plans to potentially pursue a doctorate and masters at MIT. The conversation also touches on the importance of continuing to network and keep one's resume current in the job market.
  • #1
Eng-physicist
4
0
Hey guys. I'm currently in grade 11. I'm not sure what exactly I want to do in the future but I do have plans for going for an MBA eventually. I was wondering what jobs do people with degrees in engineering physics do and if it is likely that they can also become aerospace engineers. Like most people, I would like to make lots of money, but want to do something I like. I was told that engineers make a lot according to their degree, experience, and where they graduated from. Any opinions would be great!
 
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  • #2
Rule number one: Borrowing a line from Wall Street, "Past performance is no indication of future returns." That said, most who have built careers as engineers will eventually make it to the upper middle class. This won't happen overnight, but it usually does happen.

Rule number two: Remember how your classmates treated you when you were one of the nerds? Well, that doesn't change. If you persist in being an engineer, you probably won't make much headway among the executive crowd. Engineers are often treated poorly in companies because they don't know what a good engineer can do for them or where the best investments of money would be inside the company. If you want to make real money, you'll find it in management.

As for me, I graduated from The Johns Hopkins University, Whiting School of Engineering. I have a Bachelor's degree in Electrical Engineering, and a PE in Control Systems Engineering. I've been practicing on Control Systems and SCADA systems for 26 years and intend to keep practicing until I get it right. :-)

Yes, I enjoy my work, though the company I work for is often a bit crazy. It hasn't been bad enough to chase me out the door, though they have come close at times. Though I've been there for 26 years, I keep my resume current, and I network with lots of people. You can never be too certain of your job, no matter how good you may be.
 
  • #3
Thanks for the great response. I have a quick question. Is it possible though I can reach management positions within an engineering firm with an MBA plus the engineering degrees. My goal is to be one of the head executives of an engineering firm and manage the actual projects. I am in Ontario and plan to do undergrad here but later will aim to do my doctorate and masters in MIT. I like physics, math, and chemistry, and also enjoyed economics. Of course I'm talking about high school courses and know university is much different.
 

Related to Engineering physics vs. aerospace engineering

What is the difference between engineering physics and aerospace engineering?

Engineering physics is a broad field that combines principles of physics and engineering to solve real-world problems. It involves a strong focus on understanding the underlying physical principles and applying them to develop new technologies and devices. Aerospace engineering, on the other hand, is a specialized field within engineering that specifically deals with the design, development, and testing of aircraft and spacecraft. It requires a deep understanding of aerodynamics, materials science, and propulsion systems.

Which field offers more job opportunities?

Both engineering physics and aerospace engineering offer a wide range of job opportunities in various industries such as aerospace, defense, energy, and research. However, the demand for aerospace engineers is expected to grow at a faster rate due to the increasing need for new and advanced aircraft and spacecraft technologies.

What are the key skills required for these fields?

Both engineering physics and aerospace engineering require strong analytical and problem-solving skills, as well as a solid foundation in math and physics. However, aerospace engineering also requires specialized skills in areas such as aerodynamics, control systems, and materials science. Engineering physics, on the other hand, may require additional skills in areas such as electronics, optics, and computer programming.

Is there any overlap between these two fields?

There is some overlap between engineering physics and aerospace engineering, as they both involve the application of physics and engineering principles. However, aerospace engineering is more specialized and focuses specifically on the design and development of aerospace technologies. Engineering physics, on the other hand, has a broader scope and can be applied to various industries and fields.

Which field has a higher earning potential?

The earning potential for both engineering physics and aerospace engineering is similar, with the median salary for engineers in these fields being around $90,000 per year. However, the specific job role, industry, and location can greatly impact the potential salary for an individual in either field.

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