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Engineering question

  1. Nov 13, 2007 #1
    Hi, I'm a grade 12 student aspiring to be a nanotechnology engineer.

    I was wondering whether I need super strong math skills in that field. I'm good in math, but I'm not like sparkling brilliant in math. I get low~mid 90s on school, participate in math contests, etc, but I'm not the kind of person whose brains are wired mathematically.

    I was wondering if an engineer needs to have strong mathematical talent. I'm relatively strong in physics, and pretty good in chemistry. (But I can't stand anything related to biology though)
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 13, 2007 #2
    You don't have to be a genius in math to be an engineer, or anything for that matter. All you need is the dedication to learn what you need to know. Low-Mid 90s isn't bad at all?
     
  4. Nov 13, 2007 #3
    Hard work, study groups, office hours, and mountains of time will get you through most college math courses. A knack for math never hurts, but you don't need to be some savant - just willing to put in however much work it takes to get things done. (The most important math ability for engineering is probably learning to take a real-world problem and simplify it to a mathematical model, otherwise knowing how to define and set up the problem.)

    The physics and chemistry are strongly relevant. A lot of nanotech work is being done that applies to biological/medical topics, though...explain "can't stand"? (OTOH, plenty of it doesn't.)
     
  5. Nov 13, 2007 #4

    mgb_phys

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    There is always someone who knows more maths / gets maths / loves maths - than you.
    Don't worry - you need some maths obviously, but in physics and engineering hard work usually makes up for genius ( fortunately for the rest of us).
     
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