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Engineering Student Looking to Understand the Underlying Physics Better

  1. Nov 17, 2014 #1
    Hi all, I'm an engineering student in my sophomore year of college. I'm finding that the work I'm doing in my classes is starting to require me to just put blind faith into a formula, as the increasing complexity of the systems I'm learning about has started to obscure the underlying physics. I've always learned best in the past when I have a deeper understanding of a formula's basis, so I'm planning to independent study some physics and the more heavily physics based engineering classes to develop my understanding further. I've created this account in anticipation of needing some help from time to time, and hopefully as I progress I can become more of a contributer myself.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 17, 2014 #2

    phinds

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    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    Welcome to the forum.

    That's a great plan and will serve you well. This forum is a great place to get help if/when you get bogged down.
     
  4. Nov 22, 2014 #3
    Hi I may not be able to help you but maybe you could help me. I am an ex diver and electrician . My question is if you have 2 identical balls that cannot expand or contract one has twice the pressure of air inside it and are placed on the sea floor , will one rise faster than the other?
     
  5. Nov 22, 2014 #4

    jtbell

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    Staff: Mentor

    Hi Jim, welcome to PF!

    Please ask substantive questions like this in an appropriate topical forum. This forum (New Member Introductions) is just for saying hello and some chit-chat. For your question, I suggest the General Physics forum, up closer to the top of the home page. Good luck!
     
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