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Equation of a plane multipled by a constant.

  1. Feb 21, 2012 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    Given the points A(1,2,3) B(0,1,2) and C(2,3,-1) find:
    a.) a vector perpendicular to the plane pi(A,B,C)
    b.) the equation of the plane pi(A,B,C)





    3. The attempt at a solution
    a.) ∏<5,-5,0>
    b.)∏(x-y)=∏

    Am I incorrect in assuming that I would find the normal vector and plane equations as normal and multiply the result by Pi? The question seems counter-intuitive to me because couldn't Pi be factored out at anytime?

    Thanks in advance
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2012
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 21, 2012 #2

    LCKurtz

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    I have never seen the notation Pi(A,B,C) for a plane. What does that mean? Do you mean the equation of the plane passing through the given three points? If so, ##\pi## doesn't have anything to do with it.
     
  4. Feb 21, 2012 #3

    Dick

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    I think the question is just using the notation 'pi(A,B,C)' to mean the plane through the points A, B and C. I don't think it's supposed to be the number pi.
     
  5. Feb 21, 2012 #4

    Mark44

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    I agree with Dick that ∏(A, B, C) is just notation that identifies a plane.
     
  6. Feb 21, 2012 #5
    So essentially he is using ∏ to name the plane? Either I'm misunderstanding or this was a strange question (its from a review sheet for an exam Thursday).
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2012
  7. Feb 21, 2012 #6

    Mark44

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    That's what Dick and I think. Instead of identifying it as P(A, B, C), the instructor used the equivalent Greek letter to (possibly) prevent you from thinking the P stood for "point."
     
  8. Feb 21, 2012 #7

    Dick

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    And the equation of your plane isn't quite correct in any event.
     
  9. Feb 21, 2012 #8
    Ah, dropped the negative sign, is x-y=-1 correct?
     
  10. Feb 21, 2012 #9

    Dick

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    Yep.
     
  11. Feb 21, 2012 #10
    Thanks to both of you.
     
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