Equivalent Resistance Calculation for Resistors in a Circuit

In summary, the equivalent resistance between points A and B shown in the figure is 9.33 Ohms. This was calculated by finding the equivalent resistance for R3, R4, and R5 in parallel, adding it to R6 in series, and then finding the equivalent resistance for R1, R2, and R3456 in parallel. The final result shows that R3456 is in parallel with R1 and R2, making the final equivalent resistance 9.33 Ohms.
  • #1

Homework Statement


Find the equivalent resistance between points A and B shown in the figure . Consider R1 = 4.8 Ohms, R2 = 2.5 Ohms, R3 = 3.7 Ohms, R4 = 4.4 Ohms, R5 = 4.1 Ohms, and R6 = 6.4 Ohms.

Homework Equations



1caa164cf16b7117e9f88a2bf910a391.png

0f67a9d6ad548b23212a3161ebabcf51.png

The Attempt at a Solution


I got 9.33 by adding resistors 3,4,5 in parallel [1/(1/R3+1/R4+1/R5)] and added that to R6 which is in series with the equivalent of 3,4,5 and I added 1,2 In parallel [1/(1/R1+1/R2)]. My question is that obviously I am not combing the right resistors as parallel or series, can someone help me on this? I have also tried the equivalent of 3,4,5 in parallel and adding that to the equivalent of 1,2,6 in parallel which I believe is about 2.66 anyways I've tried a few other combinations as well and cannot seem to figure out which ones I am supposedto add in parallel and which ones to add in series

Homework Statement


Homework Equations


The Attempt at a Solution

 

Attachments

  • 5416321069_49.jpg
    5416321069_49.jpg
    7.2 KB · Views: 1,318
Last edited by a moderator:
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Your approach looks okay, but I'd check your math.

First, you found an equivalent resistance for R's 3, 4, & 5 which are in parallel. Let's call that R345. What value did you get?

Then you added R345 in series with R6 and got 9.33Ω. Call that R3456. That seems a bit high to me.

Perhaps you should lay out your calculations here and we can see what's going on.
 
  • #3
The 9.33 I Got was the final answer.

This is what I did:

First R345=[1/(1/R3+1/R4+1/R5)]=[1/0.7414]=1.349 Ohms

Then I took R6= 6.4 Ohms and added it to 1.349 to get 7.749 Ohms

Then I Got R12=[1/(1/R1+1/R2)]=[1/0.608]=1.644 Ohms

Lastly I added 1.644 Ohms to 7.749 And got 9.39 Actually, Sorry.
 
  • #4
cjames9001 said:
The 9.33 I Got was the final answer.

This is what I did:

First R345=[1/(1/R3+1/R4+1/R5)]=[1/0.7414]=1.349 Ohms

Then I took R6= 6.4 Ohms and added it to 1.349 to get 7.749 Ohms

Then I Got R12=[1/(1/R1+1/R2)]=[1/0.608]=1.644 Ohms

Excellent up to here.

Lastly I added 1.644 Ohms to 7.749 And got 9.39 Actually, Sorry.

Oops. The last two resistors (R12 and R3456) are in parallel, not series.

Actually, the value for R3465 is in parallel with R1 and R2, so you could find the final result from there by doing the parallel calculation on the three.
 
  • #5
Ok, That worked, I'm a little confused as to why getting R3456 Is Parallel to R12? and Why wouldn't getting R126 And Adding it In series to R345 doesn't work? Thanks for your help so far by the way
 
  • #6
Draw a picture with R1, R2, and R3456. You'll see that all three are in parallel (they all have their ends connected to node A and node B).
 
  • #7
Ok I see what you mean, Thanks Again!
 

1. What is Resistance Equivalent?

Resistance equivalent is a measure of the total resistance in a circuit or system. It takes into account all resistive elements, such as resistors, wires, and components, and represents them as a single equivalent resistance.

2. Why is Resistance Equivalent important?

Resistance equivalent is important because it allows us to simplify complex circuits and systems into a single equivalent resistance. This makes it easier to analyze and understand the behavior of the circuit or system.

3. How is Resistance Equivalent calculated?

Resistance equivalent is calculated using the following formula: Req = R1 + R2 + R3 + ... + Rn, where Req is the equivalent resistance and R1-Rn are the individual resistances in the circuit or system.

4. What units are used for Resistance Equivalent?

The units for Resistance Equivalent are ohms (Ω), which is the standard unit of measurement for resistance.

5. How does Resistance Equivalent affect circuit or system performance?

The Resistance Equivalent can affect circuit or system performance by influencing the amount of current that can flow through the circuit. A higher resistance equivalent means there is more resistance in the circuit, resulting in less current flow. This can impact the overall functionality and efficiency of the circuit or system.

Suggested for: Equivalent Resistance Calculation for Resistors in a Circuit

Replies
10
Views
910
Replies
28
Views
947
Replies
1
Views
137
Replies
25
Views
1K
Replies
8
Views
729
Replies
11
Views
1K
Back
Top