Evaluate integral as a power series

In summary, a power series is an infinite sum of terms in the form of a<sub>n</sub>(x-c)<sup>n</sup>, used to represent functions. To evaluate an integral as a power series, the power series representation of the function must first be found and then the integral can be evaluated term by term. This method can be useful for finding antiderivatives and approximating integrals. However, not all integrals can be evaluated as power series and there are limitations such as time-consuming computations and limited convergence.
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ksr7202
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Nooo. (-x^4)^n=(-1)^n*(x^(4n)). Try it in that form. Compare that with what you had before. Do you see the difference?
 
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Related to Evaluate integral as a power series

What is a power series?

A power series is an infinite sum of terms in the form of an(x-c)n, where an represents the coefficient and (x-c)n represents the variable raised to different powers.

How do you evaluate an integral as a power series?

To evaluate an integral as a power series, you first need to find the power series representation of the function being integrated. Then, use the properties of power series and integration to evaluate the integral term by term.

What are the benefits of evaluating an integral as a power series?

Evaluating an integral as a power series can be useful for finding the antiderivative of a function, as well as for approximating the value of an integral when an exact solution is not possible.

Can any integral be evaluated as a power series?

No, not all integrals can be evaluated as a power series. The function must have a power series representation that converges in the interval of interest in order for the integral to be evaluated as a power series.

Are there any limitations to evaluating integrals as power series?

Yes, since power series are infinite sums, evaluating them can be time-consuming and may not always provide an exact solution. Additionally, the convergence of the power series may only be valid for a certain interval, making the solution limited.

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