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Insights Explosion-Generated Collapsing Vacuum Bubbles Reach 20K Kelvin - Comments

  1. Sep 13, 2015 #1

    klotza

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  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 13, 2015 #2
    Really interesting stuff! Love the animations!

    "Mantis shrimp also produce sonoluminosity in cavitations " Google+
     
  4. Sep 13, 2015 #3
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 14, 2015
  5. Sep 13, 2015 #4
  6. Sep 13, 2015 #5

    klotza

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    Yes they are. It leaves water vapour and some other stuff, and the water adsorbs into the fluid, just leaving very small amounts of other stuff.
     
  7. Sep 14, 2015 #6
    Is there a non-paywalled version of this article?

    I believe they stated that the minimum pressure of the bubble is 1 Pa with a temperature of 4,000 K at its maximum expansion. Is that correct.

    The bubble then contracts, and at least initially should compress via the ideal gas law to a peak pressure and temperature? I think the graph shows that Rmin is about 0.2 of Rmax before rebounding slightly.

    I thought in cavitation that the damaging effect comes from the bubble completely disappearing. As opposed to a flash, where the residual gas bubble mitigates the shock wave that is generated. We had a high pressure control valve where we used a small amount of N2 to keep prevent the complete collapse of the vapor phase. That worked well until the day we lost the nitrogen flow. Once the valve started cavitating, the valve was destroyed within the hour.

    Did they relate the sonoluminecense to the sound shock wave that gets generated by the shock wave? Such as the shock wave comes first followed by the sonoluminecense? Or they initiate together?

    .
     
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