FBD Help: Tension and Slowing Down

  • Thread starter woodrufs
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In summary, the conversation revolves around a physics problem involving a rocket and an instrument attached to a string. The person is seeking help in understanding the problem and finding the solution. Through the use of Newton's laws and considering the direction of acceleration, the person was able to successfully solve the problem.
  • #1
woodrufs
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Homework Statement



First of all, thank you for taking your time to look at this. I cannot seem to figure it out!

http://screencast.com/t/MzZiNjhmMzUt

I may be completely wrong, but I feel like there isn't any tension... If the ship is slowing down, doesn't that mean that the string isn't fully stretched out...? I'm so confused! :confused:

Thank you.

Homework Equations



None? It's a FBD?

The Attempt at a Solution



I'm sure this is extremely hard to see but here are my attempts. I've tried them both in the same direction and everything...

http://screencast.com/t/MmNkMzM3

Thanks again for everyone's help!
 
Last edited:
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  • #2
Draw the FBD of the instrument. You do note that the 2 forces acting on it are its weight and the tension force in the hanging wire. Since it is given that the acceleration is slowing down the rocket's (and instrument's) velocity, what direction must the acceleration be in?? Then use Newton 2, noting that the net force must be in the same direction of the acceleration. Note also that tension forces always pull away drom the object on which they act. Crunch out the numbers to get the relative scale of the weight and tension forces. (There will always be some tension in the rope, unless the object is in free fall, in which case the wire goes slack (no tension)).
 
  • #3
Yay! Thanks Jay! That helped me out and I got it right!


Thank you!
 
  • #4
You are welcome. Wecome to PF!
 
  • #5


Hello,

Thank you for reaching out for help. I understand that you are having trouble understanding the concept of tension and slowing down in a Free Body Diagram (FBD). Let me try to explain it to you.

In a FBD, we represent all the forces acting on an object as arrows. These forces can be balanced or unbalanced. When an object is in motion, there are usually multiple forces acting on it, causing it to speed up, slow down, or maintain a constant speed.

In your example, the ship is slowing down. This means that there is an unbalanced force acting on the ship, causing it to decelerate. The force that is causing this deceleration is the tension in the string. The tension is the force that the string is exerting on the ship to slow it down.

Now, you may be wondering why there is tension if the string is not fully stretched out. This is because the string does not need to be fully stretched in order to exert a force. As long as there is some tension in the string, it will exert a force on the ship.

To represent this in a FBD, you would draw an arrow pointing in the opposite direction of the ship's motion, labeled as "tension". This arrow would be equal in magnitude to the force of friction acting on the ship, which is causing it to slow down.

I hope this explanation helps you understand the concept better. If you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to ask. Remember, you can always consult your textbook or ask your teacher for clarification. Good luck with your homework!
 

Related to FBD Help: Tension and Slowing Down

1. What is tension in regards to FBD?

Tension is a force that occurs when an object is pulled or stretched by another object. In FBD, tension is a force that is represented by an arrow pointing away from the object and is caused by an external force acting on the object.

2. How does tension affect an object in FBD?

Tension can cause an object to accelerate or decelerate, depending on the direction of the force. If the tension force is greater than the opposing forces acting on the object, it will accelerate. If the tension force is less than the opposing forces, the object will decelerate.

3. What factors can affect the tension force in FBD?

The tension force in FBD can be affected by the mass of the object, the angle of the tension force, and the magnitude and direction of any external forces acting on the object.

4. How can I calculate the tension force in FBD?

The tension force can be calculated using Newton's Second Law which states that the net force on an object is equal to the mass of the object multiplied by its acceleration. In FBD, the net force is equal to the sum of all the forces acting on the object, including tension.

5. Can tension cause an object to slow down?

Yes, tension can cause an object to slow down if the opposing forces acting on the object are greater than the tension force. In this case, the object will experience a deceleration or slowing down.

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