Feynman Looking for A Particle Version of QFT

In summary, Feynman was searching for a "particle version" of quantum field theory but instead discovered the path integral approach of quantum mechanics. However, there is an existing "dressed particle" approach to QFT, which views particles as the primary objects and fields as secondary. This approach, first proposed over 50 years ago, has gained modern developments and has been cited in 46 articles. Unfortunately, it did not attract Feynman's attention, but it is considered the best way to understand QFT.
  • #1
raisin_raisin
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Feynman Looking for A "Particle Version" of QFT

Hey,
I think I read somewhere (though can't find it now) that Feynman was looking for a 'particle' version of quantum field theory which he didn't find but this instead led to the path integral approach of quantum mechanics. Can anyone shed any light on this? Not knowing that much particle physics I don't understand how QFT could get any more particle based.

Thank you in advance.
 
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  • #2


There exists a "dressed particle" approach to QFT in which fields play only secondary, auxiliary role and particles are the primary objects. The idea is more than 50 years old:

O. W. Greenberg and S. S. Schweber, "Clothed particle operators in simple models of quantum field theory", Nuovo Cim., 8 (1958), 378.

On Google Scholar you can find 46 citations of this article and some modern developments. As far as I know, this method didn't attract Feynman's attention. In my opinion, this is unfortunate, because the "dressed particle" approach is the best way to understand QFT, and Feynman might like it.

Eugene.
 
  • #3


Hi there,

That's an interesting question! From my understanding, Feynman was indeed searching for a way to reconcile the seemingly contradictory theories of quantum mechanics and special relativity. This led him to develop the path integral formulation, which allows for the calculation of probabilities in quantum systems by summing over all possible paths a particle could take.

However, even with this new formulation, Feynman was still searching for a way to incorporate the idea of particles into QFT. This led him to develop the Feynman diagrams, which are graphical representations of particle interactions in QFT. These diagrams helped to bridge the gap between the abstract mathematical equations of QFT and the physical concept of particles.

So while QFT is already inherently particle-based, Feynman's contributions helped to make the theory more intuitive and accessible by visualizing particle interactions. I hope this helps clarify things a bit!
 

Related to Feynman Looking for A Particle Version of QFT

1. What is QFT?

QFT stands for Quantum Field Theory. It is a theoretical framework that combines principles of quantum mechanics and special relativity to describe the behavior of particles and fields in the subatomic realm.

2. Why was Feynman looking for a particle version of QFT?

Feynman was looking for a particle version of QFT because he believed that the existing mathematical framework of QFT was not complete and did not fully explain the behavior of particles and their interactions.

3. What is the significance of Feynman's search for a particle version of QFT?

Feynman's search for a particle version of QFT has led to significant developments in the field of particle physics and has helped to better understand the fundamental particles and their interactions.

4. Did Feynman succeed in finding a particle version of QFT?

Yes, Feynman, along with other physicists, developed a particle version of QFT known as the Standard Model. This model successfully describes the behavior of particles and their interactions through the exchange of force-carrying particles.

5. How has Feynman's work on QFT impacted modern science?

Feynman's work on QFT has had a significant impact on modern science, particularly in the field of particle physics. His contributions have helped to develop a deeper understanding of the fundamental particles and their interactions, and have also led to the development of new technologies such as particle accelerators.

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