Figuring Out How to Solve This Problem: Volume, Pressure, & Temp

In summary, volume, pressure, and temperature are related through the ideal gas law equation PV = nRT, where the product of pressure and volume is directly proportional to the temperature of a gas. To solve problems involving these variables, rearrange the equation and use consistent units of atmospheres, liters, Kelvin, and moles. When dealing with changes in temperature and pressure, make sure to use the appropriate values and conversions. While the ideal gas law is most accurate for ideal gases at low pressures and high temperatures, it can still be used as an approximation for real gases.
  • #1
slynn2008
3
0
Need help figuring out how to do this type of problem..

The volume of an ideal gas is increased from 0.7 m3 to 2.5 m3 while maintaining a constant pressure of 3000 Pa (1 Pa = 1 N/m2). If the initial temperature is 900K, what is the final temperature (in Kelvin)?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
What equations do you know that relate temperature to volume for a gas?
 

1. How is volume related to pressure and temperature?

Volume, pressure, and temperature are all related through the ideal gas law, which states that the product of pressure and volume is directly proportional to the temperature of a gas, assuming constant moles and mass. This means that as the volume of a gas decreases, the pressure and temperature increase, and vice versa.

2. How can I use this information to solve a problem?

To solve a problem involving volume, pressure, and temperature, you can use the ideal gas law equation: PV = nRT. Rearrange the equation to solve for the unknown variable, and plug in the given values for the other variables. This will allow you to calculate the desired quantity.

3. What units should I use when solving these types of problems?

When using the ideal gas law, it is important to use consistent units throughout the equation. Pressure is typically measured in atmospheres (atm), volume in liters (L), temperature in Kelvin (K), and moles in moles (mol). Make sure to convert any given values to these units before plugging them into the equation.

4. How do I account for changes in temperature and pressure?

If the problem involves changes in temperature and pressure, it is important to use the appropriate values for each variable. For temperature, remember to convert from Celsius to Kelvin by adding 273.15. For pressure, use the appropriate conversion factor if the given pressure is not in atmospheres.

5. Can this equation be used for all gases?

The ideal gas law is based on the behavior of ideal gases, which assume no intermolecular forces and perfectly elastic collisions between particles. Therefore, it is most accurate for gases at low pressures and high temperatures. For real gases, there may be slight deviations from the ideal gas law, but it can still be used as an approximation.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
516
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
927
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
16
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
12
Views
840
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
2K
Replies
5
Views
320
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
947
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
2K
Back
Top