Find a Job in Space | Sillls from VA

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In summary, this guy went to college, did some military work, and is now trying to find a job in the space industry. He is targeting a specific company and is polishing up his resume and cover letter.
  • #1
sillls
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I am new to this forums, thank God there is a website devoted to things like this.

About me: I am a guy living in VA who is very interested in working on projects that will take me into space. I am hoping to join SpaceX or another company like it and work in space. I have been interested in this ever since I can remember. I went to collage but got out to be apart of the Air National Guard but had to leave.

Now I am trying to go back into avionics in the hopes that this will help me get to were I want to go. If you have any suggestions or any job opportunity's that could help me reach my goal, please let me know.

Thanks. Sillls
 
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  • #2
sillls said:
I went to collage but...
And what was your major, did you graduate? We need a little more information.
 
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  • #3
I went to J sargeant reynolds community college, were I got a certificate in Business management.
I also Was in the Air National Guard for six years doing Avionics work.

My two tech schools were.

Principles of Electronics
Avionics
 
  • #4
Can you use that military experience to get a job as an aircraft mechanic in your area and work your way up through the ranks to more specialized avionics-type work?
 
  • #5
I have been trying but no luck yet.
 
  • #6
Get yourself to Google and find some web sites with advice on how to write a resume and cover letter. If you can find places that lean more towards advice for technical type jobs that's best. You don't want to apply for a business admin position, I suppose.

Get yourself to the local library. Also the local university library. Find the tech magazines in subjects you are interested in. Things like Avionics Today and What Avionics and similar. The titles will mean more to you because you know which ones are relevant to you. The librarians should be treated very kindly and respectfully, as they can give you some assistance in finding the correct journals.

In those journals, look for job adverts. But also look for info on companies that look like they might be along your line of business. These will give you some hints about who to contact. Scan the articles. And scan the ads in the mag offering services you think you might be able to help with. "Hey, this company advertises it can calibrate Golonger-Kruft Stubmeters, and I just spent 2 years doing that in the airforce. I should work for them." Expand this with Google searches, and visiting the web sites of the companies you find.

What you do now is, polish up your resume to target this company. Find them on the internet and find what they do in as much detail as possible. Emphasize the things in your resume that would be useful to this company, and that you think you could be OK doing. Then write a brief cover letter explaining you are looking for a job. Package it up, and send it to their human resources department. If you can find the name of department heads in departments that seem like they might be a good fit for you, send them a resume and cover letter also.

If things are really dead, consider taking some expansion classes. Maybe your local college has some classes in some skill you could swat up. Such as learning to use some new computer program, or maybe some new chunk of equipment or something. When you finish that, add it to your resume, and send it along especially for companies that do that sort of thing. If Brilliant Avionics happens to need somebody who can use a Supersonic Drill Aligner and you just took a 6 week class on that, it could catch the eye of the department head.
 
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  • #7
There is a strong oversupply of people wanting to work in the space industries. Competition for these jobs is intense. You need to be very, very good. I'd recommend candidates even with strong resumes have a plan B.
 
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Related to Find a Job in Space | Sillls from VA

1. How can I find a job in space?

Finding a job in space can be a competitive and challenging process. However, one way to increase your chances is to acquire skills that are in high demand in the space industry, such as engineering, computer science, or astrophysics. You can also apply for internships or entry-level positions at space agencies or private companies.

2. What skills do I need to have to work in the space industry?

The specific skills required for a job in the space industry will depend on the role and company you are applying to. However, some common skills that are valued in this field include technical expertise, problem-solving abilities, teamwork, adaptability, and a strong interest in space exploration and technology.

3. Are there any specific educational requirements for a job in space?

Most jobs in the space industry will require at least a bachelor's degree in a relevant field, such as engineering, physics, or computer science. Some positions may also require a master's or doctoral degree, especially for more advanced or specialized roles. It is important to research the specific educational requirements for the job you are interested in.

4. What are some companies that offer jobs in space?

There are several companies that specialize in space exploration and offer job opportunities. Some well-known examples include NASA, SpaceX, Blue Origin, Boeing, and Lockheed Martin. However, there are also many smaller companies and startups working in the space industry that may offer job openings.

5. Can I work in space with a non-technical background?

While many jobs in the space industry do require technical skills, there are also opportunities for individuals with non-technical backgrounds. For example, there may be positions in marketing, communications, finance, or project management at space companies. Additionally, some space agencies and companies may offer internships or training programs for individuals with non-technical backgrounds who are interested in working in the space industry.

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