Finding the Center of Mass of a Human Figure

In summary, the human figure has a total mass of 42.3 kg and is made up of three parts: the torso, neck, and head with a center of mass located on the y-axis at a point 0.423 m above the origin, the upper legs with a center of mass located on the x-axis at a point 0.190 m to the right of the origin, and the lower legs and feet with a center of mass located 0.492 to the right of and 0.253 m below the origin. To find the center of mass of the figure, the mass of the arms and hands (approximately 12% of the whole-body mass) has been ignored. The x coordinate of the center
  • #1
yoshuayisrael
1
0

Homework Statement


(1) the torso, neck, and head (total mass = 42.3 kg) with a center of mass located on the y-axis at a point 0.423 m above the origin, (2) the upper legs (mass = 19.8 kg) with a center of mass located on the x-axis at a point 0.190 m to the right of the origin, and (3) the lower legs and feet (total mass = 9.91 kg) with a center of mass located 0.492 to the right of and 0.253 m below the origin. Find the (a) x coordinate and (b) the y coordinate of the center of mass of the human figure.

Note that the mass of the arms and hands (approximately 12% of the whole-body mass) has been ignored to simplify the drawing.


The Attempt at a Solution


(42.3) (0.423)+ (19.8) (0) + (9.91) (-0.253)
____________________________________________

(42.3) +(19.8) + (9.91) AM I CORRECT?
 
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  • #2
(a) X coordinate = (19.8)(0) + (9.91)(-0.492) / (42.3) + (19.8) + (9.91) (b) Y coordinate = (42.3)(0.423) + (9.91)(-0.253) / (42.3) + (19.8) + (9.91)
 
  • #3


I would like to point out that the calculation and approach used in the attempt at a solution is not entirely clear. It would be helpful to show the steps and equations used to arrive at the solution. Additionally, it is important to note that the center of mass of a human figure may vary depending on the individual's body composition and posture. Therefore, the provided values should be considered as an approximation.
 

Related to Finding the Center of Mass of a Human Figure

1. How is the center of mass of a human figure calculated?

The center of mass of a human figure is calculated by finding the average position of all the mass in the body. This is done by dividing the body into smaller segments and then calculating the mass and position of each segment using a formula.

2. Why is it important to find the center of mass of a human figure?

Finding the center of mass of a human figure is important for understanding the body's balance and stability. It is also useful in fields such as sports science, medicine, and engineering, where knowledge of the body's center of mass is crucial for optimizing performance and preventing injuries.

3. How does the center of mass change in different positions or movements?

The center of mass of a human figure changes depending on the position and movements of the body. For example, when standing upright, the center of mass is located around the hips. But when crouching or bending, the center of mass shifts towards the lower body. Similarly, during movement, the center of mass shifts to maintain balance and stability.

4. Can the center of mass of a human figure be outside the body?

Yes, the center of mass of a human figure can be outside the body in certain situations. This can happen when a person is holding an object or when performing certain movements that shift the center of mass outside the body's base of support. In these cases, the body uses different strategies to maintain balance and prevent falling.

5. How is the center of mass of a human figure used in biomechanical analysis?

The center of mass of a human figure is a crucial parameter in biomechanical analysis. It is used to analyze and understand the body's movements, forces, and energy expenditure during various activities. By tracking the center of mass, researchers can assess the efficiency and effectiveness of different movements and techniques and make recommendations for optimal performance and injury prevention.

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