Finding the radius of the satellite's circular orbit

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Homework Statement



My title was supposed to say "Finding the radius of the satellites circular orbit" but I cant seem to edit it.
<< Mentor Note -- Title fixed for you >>

A 500 kg satellite experiences a gravitational force of 3000 N, while moving in a circular orbit around the earth.

a) Find the radius of the circular orbit.
b)Find the speed of the satellite.
c)Find the period of the orbit.

Homework Equations


r=√Gm1m2/g

The Attempt at a Solution


I think I have the question set up properly but I can't figure out how to solve it on paper because my calculator won't do it. I keep getting a different answer than what the correct one is.

Part a)

r=√Gm1m2/g
r=√(6.67 x 10-11)(5.98 x 1024)(500)/3000

So the correct answer (at least what others are getting) is 8.15 x 106 but I am getting 148859.74. I've tried putting it into my calculator a few different ways but I can't get the right answer. Do I have to do this on paper? If so, how?

b) I need to find the answer from part a to solve part b, but I know how to set up the question.

v2=Gme/r
v=√Gme/r

c) Im not sure how to do part c, but I think I need to solve part b before I can do this.
 
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Answers and Replies

  • #2
haruspex
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At a guess, you are not using parentheses correctly in typing into the calculator. You certainly have not used them correctly in your post.
Please repost your equations with the right usage.
 
  • #3
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At a guess, you are not using parentheses correctly in typing into the calculator. You certainly have not used them correctly in your post.
Please repost your equations with the right usage.
r=√Gm1m2/g
r=√[(6.67 x 10-11)(5.98 x 1024)(500)]/3000

Is this better?
 
  • #4
haruspex
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r=√Gm1m2/g
Taken literally, that means r=(√G)1m2/g. I don't think that is what you mean.
Also, your g appears to stand for a force.
r=√[(6.67 x 10-11)(5.98 x 1024)(500)]/3000
and that is wrong.
Go back to the basic gravitational equation, F= etc., and start again.
 

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