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Finding uniform transmission condition

  1. Nov 4, 2015 #1
    We have never discussed about constant mechanical power transfer for the linear case, as against rotational well documented gear transmission. The energy acquired by linear motion, if varies linearly, then 0.5mv^2 must have constant differential. Trying it, if u=0, v=at.
    d/dt[0.5m(at)^2]=constant. m(a^2)t=const.Hence concluding, a is inversely proportional to root of time, and the force to be applied is proportional to {sqrrt.(m/t)}. Does this look fine?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 4, 2015 #2

    BvU

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    Who is "we"?

    "The energy acquired by linear motion, if varies linearly, then 0.5mv^2 must have constant differential "
    My interpretation: if you apply a constant power for linear acceleration, then the kinetic energy increases linearly with time.

    v = at doesn't fly, though: that's only for constant acceleration. Here if ##{1\over 2} mv^2 = B\, t## with ##B## constant.
    However, ##a## is still ##\propto \sqrt{1/t}##, but not ##\propto \sqrt{m}##.

    Do check my claims, please !

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