Flyback Converter: Working & Construction

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In summary, a flyback converter, like any DC to DC switching converter, first "chops" the DC input into a square wave, allowing it to be passed to the secondary of the transformer. This is made possible by turning on and off a transistor, which presents an AC waveform to the inductor or transformer. For more information on SMPS and flyback converters, refer to the TI Topologies reference.
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smruti
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we know that when we give dc supply to a transformer then transformer action doesn't takes place and the primary winding of a transformer gets burnt even when small dc is injected..but how the transformer used in flyback converter works in dc?? what about its construction?
 
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A flyback converter (like any DC to DC switching converter) will take a DC input and first "chop" it into a square wave, making it an alternating waveform that can then be passed to the secondary of the transformer.
 
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  • #3
smruti said:
we know that when we give dc supply to a transformer then transformer action doesn't takes place and the primary winding of a transformer gets burnt even when small dc is injected..but how the transformer used in flyback converter works in dc?? what about its construction?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switched-mode_power_supply

:smile:
 
  • #4
PMASwork said:
A flyback converter (like any DC to DC switching converter) will take a DC input and first "chop" it into a square wave, making it an alternating waveform that can then be passed to the secondary of the transformer.
but the primary winding is supplied with dc...how it will work on dc??
 
  • #5
smruti said:
but the primary winding is supplied with dc...how it will work on dc??

You didn't read the wikipedia link, did you... :smile:

Have a look at the switching waveforms for a simple DC-DC converter. The waveforms are similar for a flyback converter with a transformer...

The DC input is chopped by turning on and off a transistor, which in turn presents an AC waveform to the inductor or transformer.

http://www.maximintegrated.com/en/images/appnotes/4266/4266Fig02.gif
4266Fig02.gif
 
  • #6
thank you..:)
smruti said:
but the primary winding is supplied with dc...how it will work on dc??
 
  • #7
Here is a good reference for SMPS - TI Topologies
 
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Related to Flyback Converter: Working & Construction

1. What is a Flyback Converter?

A Flyback Converter is a type of switching power supply that converts direct current (DC) to alternating current (AC) and vice versa. It uses a transformer to store energy in its magnetic field during the on-time of the switching cycle and then releases it to the output during the off-time.

2. How does a Flyback Converter work?

The Flyback Converter works by using a transformer to store energy in its magnetic field during the on-time of the switching cycle. The energy is then released to the output during the off-time through a diode, capacitor, and load. The transformer also provides isolation between the input and output circuits.

3. What are the advantages of using a Flyback Converter?

One of the main advantages of a Flyback Converter is its simplicity and low cost compared to other types of converters. It also has a wide input voltage range and can provide both step-up and step-down conversion. Additionally, the isolated output makes it suitable for applications that require galvanic isolation.

4. What are the key components of a Flyback Converter?

The key components of a Flyback Converter include a transformer, a switching transistor, a diode, a capacitor, and a control circuit. The transformer provides isolation and energy storage, while the switching transistor controls the on/off cycles. The diode and capacitor are used to rectify and filter the output, and the control circuit regulates the output voltage.

5. What are some common applications of a Flyback Converter?

Flyback Converters are commonly used in electronic devices that require both AC and DC power, such as computer power supplies, LED lighting, and battery chargers. They are also used in industrial and automotive applications for their high efficiency, small size, and low cost.

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