Forces along non-perpendicular axes

In summary, the conversation discusses using the formula CompF = F*Cos(angle) to determine the force along the u and v axes. The value for CompF onto U is calculated as 6.93kN and the value for CompF onto V is calculated as -2.07kN in the -V direction. There may have been a mistake in the given answer due to possible modifications made to the original question.
  • #1
Imbellis
2
0
Homework Statement
F2 = 8kN; Determine the magnitude of F2 along axis u and axis v.
Relevant Equations
CompF = F*Cos(angle)
question.png
1567124547906.png

Determine Force from F2 along u and v axes.
CompF= F*Cos(angle);
CompF onto U = 8kN*Cos(30) = 6.93kN
Angle between F2 and V: 180-75 = 105; 105-30 = 75 degrees
CompF onto V = 8kN*Cos(75) = 2.07 kN. Since in the -V direction; -2.07kN.

I just would like for somebody to verify these answers. I've already missed credit on the problem (Answers shown below), I'm just clueless how they got those numbers.
1567124522625.png
 
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  • #2
Your answers are correct. I cannot even figure out what blunder was made in the given answer.
Quite often, it looks like someone modified the numbers in an existing question but failed to update the answer. This one looks weirder.
 
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Likes Imbellis
  • #3
haruspex said:
Your answers are correct. I cannot even figure out what blunder was made in the given answer.
Quite often, it looks like someone modified the numbers in an existing question but failed to update the answer. This one looks weirder.
Thanks for the confirmation! I just wanted to make sure I wasn't going crazy (I'm an undergrad and would be quite nervous if I made a mistake on a question like this) .
 

Related to Forces along non-perpendicular axes

What are forces along non-perpendicular axes?

Forces along non-perpendicular axes refer to the combination of forces acting on an object in different directions that are not at right angles to each other. This can result in a net force that is not in the same direction as any of the individual forces.

How do you calculate the net force along non-perpendicular axes?

To calculate the net force along non-perpendicular axes, you can use the Pythagorean theorem or vector addition. The Pythagorean theorem states that the square of the hypotenuse of a right triangle is equal to the sum of the squares of the other two sides. In vector addition, you break down the forces into their horizontal and vertical components and then add them together using vector algebra.

What is the difference between a balanced and unbalanced force along non-perpendicular axes?

A balanced force along non-perpendicular axes is when the individual forces acting on an object cancel each other out, resulting in no net force. An unbalanced force along non-perpendicular axes is when there is a net force acting on an object, causing it to accelerate in a certain direction.

How do forces along non-perpendicular axes affect an object's motion?

Forces along non-perpendicular axes can cause an object to move in a curved path, as the direction of the net force may be different from the direction of the individual forces. This is known as a resultant force and it determines the acceleration and direction of the object's motion.

What are some real-world examples of forces along non-perpendicular axes?

A common example of forces along non-perpendicular axes is when a car turns a corner. The tires exert a force on the ground in a direction that is not perpendicular to the car's motion, resulting in a net force that causes the car to turn. Another example is the motion of a satellite orbiting around Earth, where the gravitational force and centripetal force are not perpendicular to each other.

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